Erin Dempster

Erin has worked for many years with SQL Server, starting with SQL Server 7.0, and considers herself to be a "data generalist." Her skills go beyond SQL Server, having worked as a software developer many years ago, using ASP.Net and some JSP. In recent years, Erin has worked considerably with PowerShell, transitioning knowledge of .Net classes to PowerShell to make data import processes easier for her teams. Since 2021, she has taken on the role Azure DevOps administrator at Trean Corporation, in addition to her duties as a DBA and systems architect. Beyond her daily roles, Erin has spoken at many SQL Saturday events, as well as SQL Bits and multiple times at PASS Summit. For her dedication to sharing knowledge with the SQL Server community, in 2023, Microsoft recognized Erin with the Data Platform MVP Award.
  • Skills: SQL Server, Azure DevOps, SSIS/Azure Data Factory

Stairway to Database DevOps

Stairway to Database DevOps Level 4: Creating a new Azure Pipeline (with Azure SQL DB Deployment)

The first three levels of this series have been the lead-up to this level, automating the database deployment with Azure Pipelines. First, we started with an introduction to Azure DevOps and the Git client. Next, SQL Source Control was introduced to manage a database’s schema and manually deploy changes from the database to source control […]

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2023-12-06

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Stairway to Database DevOps

Stairway to Database DevOps Level 3: Managing Code as a Team in Git

In this level of the Stairway to Database DevOps, you'll get an introduction to branching and merging. Learn how to create a branch for making your changes to the codebase, submitting these in a code review, and then merging the changes into those made by other developers.

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2023-12-01

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Stairway to Database DevOps

Stairway to Database DevOps Level 2: Manage Code with Red Gate SQL Source Control

In this second level of the Stairway to Database DevOps, we learn to use Redgate's SQL Source Control to save and updates changes to objects, as well as tracking data in certain tables.

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2023-10-18

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Stairway to Database DevOps

Stairway to Database DevOps Level 1: Setup a Local Git Repo with Azure DevOps

In this first level of the Stairway to DevOps, you will learn how to get version control set up on your local machine and connect to an Azure DevOps repository.

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2023-10-16 (first published: )

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Question of the Day

Default Objects in Clones

On SQL Server 2022, I do this:

USE model
GO
CREATE TABLE dbo.DBALog
(logdate DATETIME2(3), logmsg VARCHAR(2000))
GO
I then create a new database:
CREATE DATABASE INVENTORY
GO
I install a new database application in here with multiple tables, views, etc. I do not run any queries. I then decide to run this code:
DBCC CLONEDATABASE(INVENTORY, Inventory_clone);
GO
What happens?

See possible answers