When SQL Server Performance Goes Bad: Implicit Conversions

When you're developing a database, the pressure is on to get something that works, using an efficient algorithm. When you are getting close to a release candidate, however, there are some programming habits that must be removed from the code, because they can cause unexpected performance problems. In this article, you'll learn how to detect and remove one such problem: reliance on implicit datatype conversions in your queries. We'll use a combination of plan cache queries, extended events, and SQL Monitor.

Do You Have Big Data?

Data sizes are always growing. Stats on world data are astounding, as are the stats many of us experience in our lives. Plenty of us have moved from MB management to GBs, and I see plenty of people dealing with TB storage at home. Most of that data is likely from images and video, but […]

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