Are the posted questions getting worse?

  • Man, I am gone for a few years and this thread is still going.ย  Glad to see so many names my faulty memory remembers.

  • Is it Friday?ย  I feel like it should be Friday.

     

    Michael L John
    If you assassinate a DBA, would you pull a trigger?
    To properly post on a forum:
    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/61537/

  • Michael L John wrote:

    Is it Friday?ย  I feel like it should be Friday.

    No... its Sunday... special extended weekend ๐Ÿ™‚

  • frederico_fonseca wrote:

    Michael L John wrote:

    Is it Friday?ย  I feel like it should be Friday.

    No... its Sunday... special extended weekend ๐Ÿ™‚

    Now it's Friday.ย  Mine started especially early too with a callout 45 minutes before my alarm!


    On two occasions I have been asked, "Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?" ... I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.
    โ€”Charles Babbage, Passages from the Life of a Philosopher

    How to post a question to get the most help http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537

  • Guess how my f$%^ing Saturday has started too.


    On two occasions I have been asked, "Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?" ... I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.
    โ€”Charles Babbage, Passages from the Life of a Philosopher

    How to post a question to get the most help http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537

  • Neil Burton wrote:

    Guess how my f$%^ing Saturday has started too.

    You mean you set your alarm on to go off on a Saturday morning ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜€

    I won't bore you with how "lovely" the required security upgrades at my place of work have mad this Friday night. ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜€ ๐Ÿ˜€ย  It's worse than doing code reviews... I'm up to about 150 WTF's in the last 4 hours or so. ๐Ÿ˜€

     

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.

    Change is inevitable... Change for the better is not.


    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • Dare I ask what happened Saturday that has everyone in a tizzy? As I was paying attention to family and not work or the news.

    Also, got a SQL 2017 error that's not making sense to me. Any advice appreciated here: https://www.sqlservercentral.com/forums/topic/error-could-not-find-a-login-matching-the-name-provided.

     

    Brandie Tarvin, MCITP Database AdministratorLiveJournal Blog: http://brandietarvin.livejournal.com/[/url]On LinkedIn!, Google+, and Twitter.Freelance Writer: ShadowrunLatchkeys: Nevermore, Latchkeys: The Bootleg War, and Latchkeys: Roscoes in the Night are now available on Nook and Kindle.

  • Avoid the news wherever possible, so no idea.

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor wrote:

    Avoid the news wherever possible, so no idea.

    Good strategy Steve, if you miss it, then it's no longer news ๐Ÿ˜‰

    ๐Ÿ˜Ž

  • Question for the smart people, and the rest of you.

    Would you endorse or get behind the statement:

    Some deadlocks are healthy.

    or

    Some level of deadlocks is healthy.

    Or is more something like:

    Some level of deadlocks we can live with.

    I'm just surprised to hear deadlocks described as "healthy" in any terms. I'd argue, in a perfect world, any deadlock is bad. I simply don't see a place where using the word "healthy" to describe deadlocks is accurate. Certainly, there's a level below which they can be tolerated, and there's a level above which they're a major issue. That level is very much up to interpretation.

    What do you think?

    "The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood"
    - Theodore Roosevelt

    Author of:
    SQL Server Execution Plans
    SQL Server Query Performance Tuning

  • Trick question, Grant.ย  I've been assured many, many times on this forum that the only acceptable answer to any question (other than "Is using AUTOSHRINK OK?") is: It Depends.

    ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Unless you're happy to have frequent occurrence of deadlock victims be your method of implementing resource contention (and here I'm imagining an application called Roman Gladiator, where the DB engine takes the frequent place of the emperor's thumb), then, no, "healthy" is not an adjective I would choose.ย  "Tolerable and infrequent" possibly.

    Then again, I'm not one of the smart people you were seeking with your question...

    ๐Ÿ™‚

    Rich

  • Grant Fritchey wrote:

    Question for the smart people, and the rest of you.

    Would you endorse or get behind the statement: Some deadlocks are healthy. or Some level of deadlocks is healthy.

    Or is more something like: Some level of deadlocks we can live with.

    I'm just surprised to hear deadlocks described as "healthy" in any terms. I'd argue, in a perfect world, any deadlock is bad. I simply don't see a place where using the word "healthy" to describe deadlocks is accurate. Certainly, there's a level below which they can be tolerated, and there's a level above which they're a major issue. That level is very much up to interpretation.

    What do you think?

    Some level of deadlocks we can live with.ย  And that's rarely and only in very specific cases.ย  As an example, we have a nighty purge process.ย  There are regular, not frequent, deadlocks.ย  The process captures the deadlock, and then tries again.ย  If it deadlocks three times, it logs what it "missed" to purge, and grabs them the next run.ย  If there are a significant number of missed records, an email gets sent.ย  We have not really had to do any intervention in years on this.

    I'm curious as to why a deadlock would be considered healthy?ย  One could possibly consider a deadlock healthy when they indicate something needs to be addressed.

    Michael L John
    If you assassinate a DBA, would you pull a trigger?
    To properly post on a forum:
    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/61537/

  • when the cost of remedying a deadlock is greater than the cost of the disruption caused by the deadlock then I'd just let the deadlocks happen.

    Since it is hard to know if that is the case, then I'd recommend trying to figure them out.

    412-977-3526 call/text

  • Thanks everyone for the feedback so far. All jives with my understanding. I've just never heard the phrase "healthy deadlocks" before, so I was curious what others thought.

     

    "The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood"
    - Theodore Roosevelt

    Author of:
    SQL Server Execution Plans
    SQL Server Query Performance Tuning

  • Grant Fritchey wrote:

    Question for the smart people, and the rest of you.

    Would you endorse or get behind the statement: Some deadlocks are healthy. or Some level of deadlocks is healthy.

    Or is more something like: Some level of deadlocks we can live with.

    I'm just surprised to hear deadlocks described as "healthy" in any terms. I'd argue, in a perfect world, any deadlock is bad. I simply don't see a place where using the word "healthy" to describe deadlocks is accurate. Certainly, there's a level below which they can be tolerated, and there's a level above which they're a major issue. That level is very much up to interpretation.

    What do you think?

    Hah. Apply it to โ€œyou and another reaching for the last cakeโ€ and youโ€™ll have your answer ๐Ÿ˜

    Far away is close at hand in the images of elsewhere.
    Anon.

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