Configuring

Full Text Search on SQL 2000 Part 4

  • Article

This article concentrates on using Full Text Search to query text located inside Microsoft Office documents. In previous articles, Microsoft Search was introduced as an add-on service to enable advanced text queries. Catalogs, the physical storage units for search, were created and indexed. The TSQL keywords CONTAINS, FORMSOF, and INFLECTIONAL were used to query the newly created Catalogs. Population Schedules along with Change Tracking options were discussed as methods to keep the Catalogs up to date with the underlying database.

2005-03-16

2,595 reads

Full Text Search on SQL 2000 Part 3

  • Article

In the previous month's articles, Full Text Searching was introduced as a way to query strings with more refinement than the usual TSQL "like" or equal operator statements. With Full Text Searching, a new file system structure is created, storing key words from selected fields into Catalogs. In addition to storing typical character fields from databases, Microsoft Office documents that have been saved as binaries can also be entered into the Catalogs. In this month's edition, we will begin with the maintenance issues required to keep these Catalogs current. Once created, these catalogs can be interrogated for key words that are near each other's proximity, the singular and plural versions of a word, or the noun and verb variations of a word. In addition, search result rankings, or weights, that usually accompany internet search engine returns can also be requested.

2005-02-10

2,147 reads

Full Text Search on SQL 2000 Part 2

  • Article

In last month's article, Full Text Searching was introduced as a way to query strings with more refinement than the usual TSQL "like" or equal operator statements. With Full Text Searching, a new file system structure is created, storing key words from selected fields into Catalogs. In addition to storing typical character fields from databases, Microsoft Office documents that have been saved as binaries can also be entered into the Catalogs. Once created, these catalogs can be interrogated for key words that are near each other's proximity, the singular and plural versions of a word, or the noun and verb variations of a word can all be searched for. In addition, search result rankings, or weights, that usually accompany internet search engine returns can also be requested.

2005-02-09

1,986 reads

Full Text Search on SQL 2000 Part 1

  • Article

Full Text Searching is a free, optional component of MS SQL 2000. When installed, it offers a vast array of additional string querying abilities. Full Text Searching allows for string comparisons similar to internet search engines, returning both results and a matching score or weight. With regular TSQL, string matching is usually limited to an exact match, or a wildcard match with the keyword "LIKE." Full Text Searching exceeds this by searching for phrases, groups of words, words near one another, or different tenses of words, such as run, running, and ran. In addition, if Microsoft Office Word or Excel documents are saved in the database, their contents can be searched like a typical varchar field. Full Text Searching is accomplished by installing a new service (Microsoft Search), and using key words in TSQL designed specifically for text searching. This article will demonstrate installing, configuring and using the Full Text Search engine.

2005-02-08

2,282 reads

Setting up a reboot cycle for Active/Passive Cluster SQL Server

  • Article

Every organization has a system of weekly reboots or monthly reboots etc., for all their servers. When it comes to clustered servers, the reboot cycle would be little different. Usually the active node in the cluster will always be active, unless there is a failover initiated manually or when there is a hardware failure etc.

In this article, I am going to explain how to reboot cluster nodes.

2005-02-03

2,894 reads

Best Practices are always the Best

  • Article

On this site, we have taken a contrarian approach to looking at the ways to configure SQL Server with our Worst Practices series. However Microsoft still looks at it from the other side and release a tool called the Best Practices Analyzer for SQL Server. Author Dinesh Asanka brings us a short look at this tool.

4 (1)

2004-11-11

12,613 reads

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