Burnout

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This editorial was originally published on Oct 29, 2015. It is being republished as Steve is on vacation. Kind of a funny one to schedule for my vacation

I'm sure that many people end going through burnout at some point in their career. While most of us might enjoy technology, and we get a kick out of working with data, at some point you're not going to like your job. This could be because you're overworked, or it could be that you don't have enough to do. Either way, I would bet that many people flow through the phases of burnout that Kendra Little documented in this post.

Burnout isn't necessarily the end of a job, but it is a state that most of us wouldn't want to remain in. Apart from disliking your own situation, and perhaps annoying your fellow employees, you certainly aren't helping your career. Especially if you are in stages 1 or 2.

I've seen stage 3 be positive or negative, but it doesn't really work out well to try and outwork the job. Most of the time this leads to unhealthy levels of work for you, and unrealistic future expectations for your employer. When things aren't going well, do as Kendra suggests and address the issues. Make those small changes that adjust your attitude and help you cope better. Smile, try to view the things that bother you from the perspective of others, and  look to keep perspective with what you do. Most of us aren't in life-threatening or hazardous jobs, and we should remember that.

If you think you're burned out and really need to switch jobs, make a plan to move on. Looking for another job is stressful, and it's hard, but the best time to do it is while you have another job. Take your time and make a good decision for your future. Perhaps the project of looking for a new job will help ease the troubles you face at this one.

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