source control

External Article

Core Database Source Control Concepts

  • Article

Sometimes, it isn't the technicalities or details of database source control that people find difficult, but the general concepts and workflow. In this article, taken from Robert Sheldon's book 'SQL Server Source Control Basics' , he takes a step back from the details to explain the whole purpose of database source control and the most important operations within source control such as versioning, branching and merging.

2017-03-21

5,188 reads

Stairway to Database Source Control

Stairway to Database Source Control Level 5: Working with Others (Distributed Repository)

  • Stairway Step

This level starts with an overview of how versioning works in Git, a DVCS, and suggests a sensible database project versioning strategy. It then offers some simple, but illustrative, practical examples showing how to share database changes and deal gracefully with any conflicting changes.

2016-05-18

1,386 reads

External Article

Database Version Control

  • Article

By placing under source control everything we need to describe any version of a database, we make it much easier to achieve consistent database builds and releases, to find out who made which changes and why, and to access all database support materials. Matthew Skelton explains how to make sure your version control system fully supports all phases of the database lifecycle, from governance, development, delivery and through to operations.

2016-04-21

4,275 reads

Stairway to Database Source Control

Stairway to Database Source Control Level 4: Getting a Database into Source Control (Distributed Repository)

  • Stairway Step

Now that we have our database under source control, we will want to share our work with other developers. If we are in a centralized source control system, our changes may be committed straight into the central repository.

When we are working in a distributed system, it means pulling down any changes from other developers, addressing any areas of conflict, and pushing our changes up to allow others to benefit from our work. This allows our changes to be synchronized with the changes other developers have made.

This level is principally about setting up a distributed source control system, namely Git, and how to commit database development changes to a local repository, before pushing them into a remote 'central' repository for sharing with other developers.

The next level will delve a little deeper into Git's versioning mechanisms, and show some examples of how to share database changes during development, and how to deal with conflicting changes.

2016-02-03

2,613 reads

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