Stairways

To keep up to date with all the technologies in SQL Server, the DBA or developer who wants to stay ahead is faced with the struggle of constant learning. How do you keep up while avoiding information overload, unnecessary detours and dead-ends?

The SQL Server Stairways is our solution to this problem. Designed to smooth out even the steepest learning curve, each Stairway is a SQL tutorial series focused on a single topic and is arranged into no more than a dozen easily-navigable tutorials that we call 'steps'. Each step is the length of a typical magazine tutorial, and emphasizes practical, hands-on learning, with just enough background theory to help you understand the topic at a deeper level.

Using straightforward language and avoiding jargon and marketing babble, each Stairway tutorial series is designed to take you from zero knowledge of a particular SQL Server topic to a level of practical understanding that will allow you to start using that feature in a production environment. The learning gradient is steady and manageable, but also brisk. You won't be wasting time.

Happy climbing!

Stairway to MDX

Stairway to MDX

Multidimensional Expressions (MDX) is a standard query language, derived from SQL but geared specifically for OLAP databases. It also includes a calculation language, with syntax similar to spreadsheet formulas. It is an important skill for PowerPivot. Bill's new series for MDX starts right at the very beginning and takes us through all the basic functions of MDX, with plenty of practical examples.

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2011-02-04

6,757 reads

Stairway to SQL Server Indexes

Stairway to SQL Server Indexes

Indexes are fundamental to database design, and tell the developer using the database a great deal about the intentions of the designer. Unfortunately indexes are too often added as an afterthought when performance issues appear. Here at last is a simple series of articles that should bring any database professional rapidly "up to speed" with them.

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2005-04-11

15,309 reads

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Question of the Day

Default Objects in Clones

On SQL Server 2022, I do this:

USE model
GO
CREATE TABLE dbo.DBALog
(logdate DATETIME2(3), logmsg VARCHAR(2000))
GO
I then create a new database:
CREATE DATABASE INVENTORY
GO
I install a new database application in here with multiple tables, views, etc. I do not run any queries. I then decide to run this code:
DBCC CLONEDATABASE(INVENTORY, Inventory_clone);
GO
What happens?

See possible answers