Packaged-Application Database Nightmares - A Horror Story.

  • SQLBlimp

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6325

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item Packaged-Application Database Nightmares - A Horror Story.

  • Alex Friedman

    Right there with Babe

    Points: 755

    So very familiar :laugh:

    Happily the happy ending came about as well.

  • Jo Pattyn

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 31393

    Great story

  • jvgn

    SSC Rookie

    Points: 29

    It's reality. Our stories.

  • ben.mcintyre

    SSCommitted

    Points: 1818

    Thought I might have heard a ghostly voice whisper 'ORM ... ORM' at some point in there.

  • akljfhnlaflkj

    SSC Guru

    Points: 76202

    Thanks for the story. Haven't experienced anything quite that bad.

  • pollokoff

    Mr or Mrs. 500

    Points: 569

    You had me up until the point when management began listening to the DBA. After years of being proved right in the end, I still have to fight with management to make sure things are designed correctly UP FRONT. And still often lose the fight until once again I am proven right in the end. <SIGH>

    Gordon Pollokoff

    Wile E. is my reality, Bugs Bunny is my goal - Chuck Jones
    Walking on water and developing software from a specification are easy if both are frozen. - E. Berard
    Doing more things faster is no substitute for doing the right things. - S. R. Covey
    Any sufficiently advanced bug is indistinguishable from a feature.- R. Kulawiec

  • dbeggs57

    SSC-Addicted

    Points: 457

    After reading just the first section "The Horror Begins", I thought you were talking about a Microsoft Dynamics application. With a slight bit of exaggeration added, just slight. I am the BI developer of one of these older Dynamics packages. I am glad to hear it is a (semi-)fictional story.

    Dan Beggs

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 996510

    From the article:


    This horror story is fictionalized...

    Heh... no it's not. It almost perfectly describes what I've been through twice and am still trying to pick up the pieces. 😛

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)
    Forum FAQ

  • cyp901

    Mr or Mrs. 500

    Points: 539

    I'd love to start a centralized wall of shame website for vendors that deploy databases this way.

  • Chris Harshman

    SSC-Forever

    Points: 42086

    Tears of joy fill your eyes are you are looking at a perfectly designed fourth-normal-form diagram!

    hmm... I would be skeptically cautious about a database implemented completely in perfect fourth-normal-form. Once the business starts demanding reports run against this database, and doesn't want to spend the time to do a data warehouse, this will quickly become the bane of that DBA's existence. Converting developers to your line of thinking is easier than converting business people.

  • SQLBlimp

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6325

    Chris Harshman (12/22/2015)


    SQLBlimp Wrote:Tears of joy fill your eyes are you are looking at a perfectly designed fourth-normal-form diagram!

    hmm... I would be skeptically cautious about a database implemented completely in perfect fourth-normal-form. Once the business starts demanding reports run against this database, and doesn't want to spend the time to do a data warehouse, this will quickly become the bane of that DBA's existence. Converting developers to your line of thinking is easier than converting business people.

    Agreed. In the modern era, the business should (but often does not) consider a data warehouse as part of the original deployment. I hate reports running against OLTP.

    Thanks

    John.

  • HighTechAngel1

    SSC Rookie

    Points: 26

    The introduction of the story albeit far-fetched it's some sort of a reality in some places.

  • skeleton567

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5035

    I sincerely wish I could hypothesize that a script failed to run somewhere in the installation, but my personal experience is that most current database systems are forced to be designed to minimize the risk of poorly developed and tested code with the goal of avoiding maintenance and support problems.

    A good DBA can make the appropriate modifications for accuracy and performance, but at great personal risk of criticism if such changes cause application code issues.

    The last ten years of my forty-two years in IT saw a change away from accuracy of data and performance to total emphasis on 'up time', even when the data that was required to be available was total inaccurate.

    At one company, it was even dictated to IT by owners that users be allowed to enter their data regardless of accuracy based on the assumption that 'close is good enough' and 'somebody will fix it later'. This meant that engineering designs normally required multiple iterations of user attention to get things even close to accurate. Items in physical layouts could literally end up down the street in the next block.

    Rick

    The only thing worse than being an influencer
    is believing one.

  • j.peavey

    Valued Member

    Points: 51

    Please add to your bulletined list: All tables are six characters in length and use a cryptographic algorithm for the name.:-D

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