The WFH Challenges

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 719984

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item The WFH Challenges

  • MVDBA (Mike Vessey)

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 21757

    I've had to work from home for the last few days due to NHS guidelines, I found myself doing things like having a shave while in a conference call and not getting dressed until lunchtime...

    I like getting dressed for work and changing back into casuals after work - it means I know where my work day starts and where it ends.

    working from home is not for me

    MVDBA

  • PB_BI

    SSCoach

    Points: 17094

    Everyone is missing the most important barrier to home working. Tips on overcoming it can be found in this helpful guide: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IW3lhfVpLL4

    😀


    I'm on LinkedIn

  • x

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 23571

    PB_BI wrote:

    Everyone is missing the most important barrier to home working. Tips on overcoming it can be found in this helpful guide: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IW3lhfVpLL4

    😀

    And for petes sake, wash your hands people!

     

  • Y.B.

    SSChampion

    Points: 11549

    The last company I worked for downsized their offices which meant they were looking for volunteers to work from home.  Since I had a long commute I figured I'd give it a go.  That first week was probably the least productive I have EVER been in my working career.  I did eventually get into a routine.  Making sure I had a proper desk setup in an area free from distraction was a huge help.  Now my workplace is only 15 minutes from home and I'm all too happy to be back in an office.  Given a choice I'd rather not work from home but there are certain times when it's still a great option to have.


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  • MVDBA (Mike Vessey)

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 21757

    Y.B. wrote:

    The last company I worked for downsized their offices which meant they were looking for volunteers to work from home.  Since I had a long commute I figured I'd give it a go.  That first week was probably the least productive I have EVER been in my working career.  I did eventually get into a routine.  Making sure I had a proper desk setup in an area free from distraction was a huge help.  Now my workplace is only 15 minutes from home and I'm all too happy to be back in an office.  Given a choice I'd rather not work from home but there are certain times when it's still a great option to have.

    wait until you get a really annoying pet cat that wants to walk over your laptop while you work

    MVDBA

  • carl.gregory

    Valued Member

    Points: 60

    I've worked a modified work from home schedule over the years.  One item I noticed when I first started was I would do more work at home than I would in the office - missing breaks and sitting at the computer wondering if someone was tracking my every move (my first time telecommuting - at Citibank, I believe they were) .

    My best advice is treat this experience like you would if you were at the office.  Get up, walk around.  Take your breaks and lunch. Make sure that your company chat program is running and you're logged into it.  In this age of cell phones, make sure you have your coworkers numbers.  Send them texts - even ask them if you can call if you're going stir crazy.

    If you're having issues with your work, send a chat to your boss asking when they are free for a call.  I started doing that years ago when my immediate boss wasn't 10 feet away from me, but was 3,000 miles away.

    Social interaction is the key.  Even if it's electronic.

  • pwhoyt

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 157

    I work from home 100% of the time, and have done so for the past 15 years.  I've been quite successful in that mode.  Prior to that, I'd worked in numerous office settings for F50 clients.

    The biggest challenge for me is maintaining "Work-Life Separation".  There is a tendency to put in MUCH longer hours.  I don't think I've ever NOT put in at least a 10 hour day.  I know people who habitually put in even more.

    I take draconian measures to ensure I maintain separation of Work vs Life.  I designed the house that I live in, and I have an office that's totally separate from the rest of the house (it's on the far side of the garage, and is VERY nice).  That's where I go when I "go to work".

    We don't have children, and I don't have any other distractions here.  I schedule myself "Out of Office" during lunchtime, and also after normal hours, and I leave my work phone on my desk when the work day is done.  I do not take "work" back into the house with me, and I am absolutely not available on weekends or when on the rare vacation.  I do not give out my personal phone number to anyone at work (a lesson I learned the hard way, btw).

    Notably, my spouse - who commutes to an office - often brings work home.  Very often.

    Knowing what I know now, I would never work for a company that made me go into an office.  I get so much more done when I have peace-and-quiet, versus all the noises and distractions that an office setting brings.  What really started me thinking about this was a situation years ago, back when I was working in an office.  I'd discovered that if I *really* needed to get something done, I was more effective if I brought it home and worked on it there and "got it done".

    There's also the trade of sitting in traffic for 2 hours every day for 2 hours of "extra work" that I am able to put in every day.  If they ever made me go back into an office, that's 2 hours (at least) of productivity every day that they'd lose right off the top.

    Work From Home works for me.   I wouldn't want it any other way.

  • MVDBA (Mike Vessey)

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 21757

    pwhoyt wrote:

    I work from home 100% of the time, and have done so for the past 15 years.  I've been quite successful in that mode.  Prior to that, I'd worked in numerous office settings for F50 clients.

    The biggest challenge for me is maintaining "Work-Life Separation".  There is a tendency to put in MUCH longer hours.  I don't think I've ever NOT put in at least a 10 hour day.  I know people who habitually put in even more.

    I take draconian measures to ensure I maintain separation of Work vs Life.  I designed the house that I live in, and I have an office that's totally separate from the rest of the house (it's on the far side of the garage, and is VERY nice).  That's where I go when I "go to work".

    We don't have children, and I don't have any other distractions here.  I schedule myself "Out of Office" during lunchtime, and also after normal hours, and I leave my work phone on my desk when the work day is done.  I do not take "work" back into the house with me, and I am absolutely not available on weekends or when on the rare vacation.  I do not give out my personal phone number to anyone at work (a lesson I learned the hard way, btw).

    Notably, my spouse - who commutes to an office - often brings work home.  Very often.

    Knowing what I know now, I would never work for a company that made me go into an office.  I get so much more done when I have peace-and-quiet, versus all the noises and distractions that an office setting brings.  What really started me thinking about this was a situation years ago, back when I was working in an office.  I'd discovered that if I *really* needed to get something done, I was more effective if I brought it home and worked on it there and "got it done".

    There's also the trade of sitting in traffic for 2 hours every day for 2 hours of "extra work" that I am able to put in every day.  If they ever made me go back into an office, that's 2 hours (at least) of productivity every day that they'd lose right off the top.

    Work From Home works for me.   I wouldn't want it any other way.

    How do you find working with VPN connections, Lag and having to use tools like teams or skype?

    every time I've worked from home then I work twice as hard and feel the need to display this, because there are a few people I work with that have a reputation for having "very long knaps and going to the pub" when working from home - sadly the gossip culture makes us hard workers worry about what is said about us if we "work from home"

    MVDBA

  • oogibah

    SSC Eights!

    Points: 802

    At my work we have a hybrid schedule, I work from home two days a week and the teams thing is something I do constantly try to keep on top of.  I make sure that I'm always available when I work from home and reply as quickly as possible to any email or message.  This isn't the case for most people when they are in the office but I feel like its very important to show that you are present when WFH.  That being said it really depends on what I'm working on at the time whether or not its better for me.  If I have a large solo project I'm doing, it works well.  For meetings, personally, I prefer phone conferencing into meetings rather than being there in person.

    It all depends on the person, how much social interaction you require and how many distractions you have at home and how you mitigate those.

  • Doctor Who 2

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7868

    Starting today all state departments have had to let people work from home. This has resulted in several challenges, many I won't go into.

    For me, in a way, it isn't hard. 5 years ago when I was unemployed for a long time, working from home was thrust upon me. I had to learn how to do to, so I adapted. That experience is coming back at this time. I'm thankful that I can work from home now.

    Rod

  • MVDBA (Mike Vessey)

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 21757

    The UK last night announced that if any symptoms are shown then 14 days isolation... people at risk are to take 3 Months of isolation.

    I had a serious condition in December and am classed as at risk (as are my father who has just had a triple bypass and my mother who has a blood disorder, my brother who had a brain aneurysm) -

    hell no!!!!! i'm working  - I could not stand 3 months working from home and my only personal contact is the takeaway driver or the shopping delivery guy.

    I've been tested for the virus and I don't have it (not to say I wont get it) so i'm going so soldier on despite having "Man Flu" (if you are from England you will get that joke)

    MVDBA

  • pwhoyt

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 157

    MVDBA (Mike Vessey) wrote:

    How do you find working with VPN connections, Lag and having to use tools like teams or skype?

    every time I've worked from home then I work twice as hard and feel the need to display this,

    Working through a VPN is fine.  I was initially very concerned about this, and secured - and TESTED - connectivity before I even bought the land.  A small price to pay, compared to the alternative.

    I too feel the need to display that "I'm here, and I'm working".  I'm always - ALWAYS - the first person online in the mornings, and I'm the one who usually discovers (and fixes) issues, often before commuters arrive at the office.

    Interestingly, my wife is now (as of today) working from home.  Her company just directed their people to do so.  She's having a hard time of it, for two reasons:  (1) there is an additional paperwork burden being newly imposed by her employer for those who are now working from home; and (2) she is a very social person - unlike me.

    Clearly, some people are clearly better suited working from home than others.  My wife and I are good examples of each.

     

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 719984

    Mike, I appreciate you wanting to soldier on, but it's not just about you. Certainly we wouldnt' want you to get sick, but what if you get sick and expose someone else? What if they have larger issues?

    Don't be too tough here and forget the bigger picture.

  • Lynn Pettis

    SSC Guru

    Points: 442337

    I started working from home last year and I like it to honest.  I do have the occasional distraction but it isn't hard to make up the time lost as a result.  Starting today, my company has directed those that can work from home to do so until further notice.  There are those how can't due to contractual requirements or the nature of their work.

    There are some adjustments that need to be made, but considering there is little difference for me between sitting in the office or here at home.

     

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