Other IDEs

  • Comments posted to this topic are about the item Other IDEs

  • As I have to work with a number of different DB platforms I use Aquafold DataStudio.  It has the ability to act as an SSH client as well.

    I took some time to migrate my SQLPrompt snippet into Aquafolder Data Studio abbreviations.

    I really like the JetBrains IDEs though I use VS Code for most stuff.  I doubt that I am using a fraction of the capabilities of VS Code.  At least these days there are youtube videos to help learn what all the features are.  I think learning the IDE may be one of the areas of tech we forget to devote time to.

  • I also work with numerous databases (PostgreSQL, Redshift, SQL Server, DB2, Oracle, and others) and therefore use dBeaver. I found it works quite well with a consistent approach across all platforms. It doesn't have some of the cool SQL Server specific features that SSMS does, but it works pretty well considering it has to work with multiple platforms, especially for a free tool!

  • Not being a DBA, I generally stay focused around SSMS and Visual Studio for my db and SSIS development. VS Code and ADS are interesting, but I have not yet taken the necessary time to learn them well enough to be willing to make me leave SSMS behind.

    Luther

     

  • Aaron N. Cutshall wrote:

    I also work with numerous databases (PostgreSQL, Redshift, SQL Server, DB2, Oracle, and others) and therefore use dBeaver. I found it works quite well with a consistent approach across all platforms. It doesn't have some of the cool SQL Server specific features that SSMS does, but it works pretty well considering it has to work with multiple platforms, especially for a free tool!

    One of my colleagues swears by dBeaver. And he has to work some some obscure database I can't even remember the name of right now. It looks good, too.

    Kindest Regards, Rod Connect with me on LinkedIn.

  • At my last firm, we heavily relied on RapidSQL (IDERA, formerly Embarcadero) since we used a variety of databases. I did prefer using SSMS for SQL Server development as it was targeted toward that platform.

  • My personal preference is to avoid the "all in one" solutions as they often have limited features and updates have a higher chance of introducing bugs in features I use.  I like using the right tool for the job rather than trying to use a hammer as a screwdriver.  Sometimes the right tool for the job is the hammer, but if a hammer is the only tool you use, you are likely missing out on a bunch of cool features in the dedicated tools!

    So my free weapons of choice for database related things are SSMS for TSQL, Profiler (I know others will say use extended events, but I got used to profiler and it works for 99% of the use cases I need to use it for and it is quick and easy to use) for analyzing running queries, visual studio for SSRS and SSIS and I like SentryOne's Plan Explorer for doing stuff with execution plans.  Still use SSMS to generate the execution plan, but then save it to disk and load it up in Plan Explorer to work with it.  I also like XEvents Profiler, although it is a bit limited at the moment.  My hope is one day it will be a replacement for Profiler but that may be a pipe  dream.

    I use paid tools as well, but was wanting to just stick with free ones so this didn't feel to spammy.

    In the  article you mention PoSH as well, and my tool of choice (despite the bugs I've found and live with) is Powershell Plus Professional Edition (which is free).  The best feature of it - one click code signing.  Bugs though are when working in the console I've had it reset on me many times.  The code editor window is decent and the command history is nice and it integrates to source control (which I am not using for powershell at the moment as I don't do THAT  much in it).  One thing it lacks that I really like in the Powershell IDE version that comes with Windows 10 is the command lookup window.

    My preference for any tool is still to have a lot of single-purpose applications that look, feel, and work the way I expect.  Last thing I want is an all in one tool that gets an update to fix a bug in a feature I don't use and creates a bug in a feature I do use or worse - removes a feature I rely on.

  • Even though I'm a C# developer that works mostly in Visual Studio, whenever I'm working with SQL I stick to the tried and (mostly) true SSMS.  Although I'm pretty upset that they have taken out the SQL Debugger starting in version 18.  Huge mistake.  Does anyone know of other free or low cost tools that can support stored procedure debugging?

  • I've found that Azure Data Studio is only useful if you want to run the query from a Linux workstation instead of Windows, or if you need to query against Azure.  I've been happy with Management Studio for a long time, and 18.5 has finally fixed a lot of the annoying bugs that have crept in since they build SSMS on top of VS libraries.

     

  • Thanks for this discussion, Steve!

    Does anyone used TOAD for SQL Server? Is it worth it?

    -- webrunner

    -------------------
    A SQL query walks into a bar and sees two tables. He walks up to them and asks, "Can I join you?"
    Ref.: http://tkyte.blogspot.com/2009/02/sql-joke.html

  • Mr. Brian Gale wrote:

    In the  article you mention PoSH as well, and my tool of choice (despite the bugs I've found and live with) is Powershell Plus Professional Edition (which is free).  The best feature of it - one click code signing.

    Is this the tool from Idera?  If so - it could be the best tool on the market and I still would not use it.  I tried downloading some of their free tools before - and it took moving to another company before they stopped harassing me at least 2 or 3 times a month.  Every time they called I told them I was not someone who could even make a decision on purchasing - and yet they keep on calling.

    So...that is one I would not use.

    Jeffrey Williams
    Problems are opportunities brilliantly disguised as insurmountable obstacles.

    How to post questions to get better answers faster
    Managing Transaction Logs

  • Jeffrey Williams wrote:

    Mr. Brian Gale wrote:

    In the  article you mention PoSH as well, and my tool of choice (despite the bugs I've found and live with) is Powershell Plus Professional Edition (which is free).  The best feature of it - one click code signing.

    Is this the tool from Idera?  If so - it could be the best tool on the market and I still would not use it.  I tried downloading some of their free tools before - and it took moving to another company before they stopped harassing me at least 2 or 3 times a month.  Every time they called I told them I was not someone who could even make a decision on purchasing - and yet they keep on calling.

    So...that is one I would not use.

    You are right - PowershellPlus Professional Edition IS an Idera tool.  They do call a lot but I find that pretty much any company that I have tried a demo of their tool does that.  They want to make a sale, so I get it.  I get calls and emails from Idera and Quest are the SQL ones I get calls and emails from, and I get tons of spam from Dell on their servers even though I do nothing with them.  Dell sponsored a webinar I attended ages back and I got on their email and phone list from that.

    That being said, I like both Idera and Quest tools even though I've only played with the demos.  The cost of the tools compared to what we are using (RedGate) has made us stick with them.  One feature I like about both Quest and Idera is that they offer a native app or a web interface for their tools. I prefer the dedicated apps for tools over web apps when it makes sense.

  • Kevin Wood-419472 wrote:

    Even though I'm a C# developer that works mostly in Visual Studio, whenever I'm working with SQL I stick to the tried and (mostly) true SSMS.  Although I'm pretty upset that they have taken out the SQL Debugger starting in version 18.  Huge mistake.  Does anyone know of other free or low cost tools that can support stored procedure debugging?

    Same here. I use Visual Studio for C# development and keep forgetting that it has a database interface. I use SSMS for SQL Server and Advanced Query Tool from Cardette & Assoc. for DB/2.

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Login to reply