No Files For You

  • Andy Warren

    SSC Guru

    Points: 119694

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item No Files For You

  • free_mascot

    One Orange Chip

    Points: 27168

    Missed today as I went back to my old days SQL 2000 đŸ™‚

    What would be the error message in SQL 2000? If error message is same points should be awarded to this answer too.

    Thank you Andy for interesting QOD.

    ---------------------------------------------------
    "Thare are only 10 types of people in the world:
    Those who understand binary, and those who don't."

  • Koen Verbeeck

    SSC Guru

    Points: 258985

    The answer is incorrect.

    The question clearly states that the databases are on site. Thus, by the process of elimination, the corruption answer is the only one left.

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • Mark Fitzgerald-331224

    SSCrazy Eights

    Points: 8489

    Koen Verbeeck (6/18/2014)


    The answer is incorrect.

    The question clearly states that the databases are on site. Thus, by the process of elimination, the corruption answer is the only one left.

    +1

    You are working for a company that has uses SQL 2012 for their on site databases. A fellow DBA is trying to do a quick check on a database by running this query:

    Clearly states both ONSITE and SQL 2012. So CLOUD and SQL 2000 answers can be discounted. The system view name is correct and exists in all SQL 2008+ databases. So logically must be the only remaining option, unlikely as it may be, a corruption of some kind.

    Fitz

  • Neil Burton

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 22266

    You are working for a company that has uses SQL 2012 for their on site databases.

    This explicitly rules out that the databases are in the cloud, the answer to this question seems no better than a guess.


    On two occasions I have been asked, "Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?" ... I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.
    —Charles Babbage, Passages from the Life of a Philosopher

    How to post a question to get the most help http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537

  • rhythmk

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7162

    Again it seems a disputed question :blink:

    Seems the language of question can be verified again.However I have seen that Andy has posted his QotD very well but somehow he missed it this time.

    --rhythmk
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    To post your question use below link

    https://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/forum-etiquette-how-to-post-datacode-on-a-forum-to-get-the-best-help
    đŸ™‚

  • Koen Verbeeck

    SSC Guru

    Points: 258985

    BWFC (6/18/2014)


    You are working for a company that has uses SQL 2012 for their on site databases.

    This explicitly rules out that the databases are in the cloud, the answer to this question seems no better than a guess.

    Indeed. The question is like: "... and there is no A."

    The explanation: "Haha. There still might be A, because you know, the company is progressive."

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • Neil Burton

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 22266

    Koen Verbeeck (6/18/2014)


    BWFC (6/18/2014)


    You are working for a company that has uses SQL 2012 for their on site databases.

    This explicitly rules out that the databases are in the cloud, the answer to this question seems no better than a guess.

    Indeed. The question is like: "... and there is no A."

    The explanation: "Haha. There still might be A, because you know, the company is progressive."

    Actually, on a second read, the question doesn't rule out the fact that there are databases in the cloud. However, I wouldn't necessarily make the connection between using 2012 and having databases on the cloud. If we're playing Technology Inferences((TM) Neil Burton) it's a similar leap to think 'this lot are so backward they're still using 2012 when the true innovators are already on 2014. They've probably still got 2000 databases somewhere'.


    On two occasions I have been asked, "Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?" ... I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.
    —Charles Babbage, Passages from the Life of a Philosopher

    How to post a question to get the most help http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537

  • Koen Verbeeck

    SSC Guru

    Points: 258985

    BWFC (6/18/2014)


    Koen Verbeeck (6/18/2014)


    BWFC (6/18/2014)


    You are working for a company that has uses SQL 2012 for their on site databases.

    This explicitly rules out that the databases are in the cloud, the answer to this question seems no better than a guess.

    Indeed. The question is like: "... and there is no A."

    The explanation: "Haha. There still might be A, because you know, the company is progressive."

    Actually, on a second read, the question doesn't rule out the fact that there are databases in the cloud. However, I wouldn't necessarily make the connection between using 2012 and having databases on the cloud. If we're playing Technology Inferences((T) Neil Burton) it's a similar leap to think 'this lot are so backward they're still using 2012 when the true innovators are already on 2014. They've probably still got 2000 databases somewhere'.

    On site means on site. Even a private cloud is not possible, since SQL Azure is not a private cloud technology.

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • Neil Burton

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 22266

    Koen Verbeeck (6/18/2014)


    BWFC (6/18/2014)


    Koen Verbeeck (6/18/2014)


    BWFC (6/18/2014)


    You are working for a company that has uses SQL 2012 for their on site databases.

    This explicitly rules out that the databases are in the cloud, the answer to this question seems no better than a guess.

    Indeed. The question is like: "... and there is no A."

    The explanation: "Haha. There still might be A, because you know, the company is progressive."

    Actually, on a second read, the question doesn't rule out the fact that there are databases in the cloud. However, I wouldn't necessarily make the connection between using 2012 and having databases on the cloud. If we're playing Technology Inferences((TM) Neil Burton) it's a similar leap to think 'this lot are so backward they're still using 2012 when the true innovators are already on 2014. They've probably still got 2000 databases somewhere'.

    On site means on site. Even a private cloud is not possible, since SQL Azure is not a private cloud technology.

    I agree that on site means on site but if you screw your face up and squint, you can infer that there may, possibly, just might be databases that are in the cloud that also use 2012. The question doesn't say that are no databases in the cloud, just that those on site use 2012. Which is still a huge step from the what we were given to what we needed. As I said, there is no reason not to assume that there wasn't a 2000 database lying around somewhere because the question doesn't say 'for all their on site databases.


    On two occasions I have been asked, "Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?" ... I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.
    —Charles Babbage, Passages from the Life of a Philosopher

    How to post a question to get the most help http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537

  • Toreador

    SSChampion

    Points: 11261

    You are working for a company that has uses SQL 2012 for their on site databases. A fellow DBA is trying to do a quick check on a database by running this query:

    I'm surprised that people are claiming that this statement proves the answer wrong. It's what led me straight to the correct answer.

    They use SQL 2012 for their on site databases. Why include the qualifier "on site"?

    The DBA is doing a quick link on "a database" - rather than "one of these databases".

    Ah - "on site" is included, because "a database" is somewhere else. So could be on a server hosted at a different site, in which case the answer is SQL2000. Or it could be in the cloud. Which is more likely? They're using SQL2012, so less likely that they're using SQL2000 elsewhere. Of course the company might have just bought another company who were 15 years out of date in their technology, but the balance of probabilities seemed to favour the cloud đŸ™‚

  • tripleAxe

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5605

    I'm sure that many progressive companies running on SQL 2012 also have previous versions of SQL still in use. I know we do. We have all versions of SQL from 2000 up to 2014 in the production environment. We do not however have any cloud based SQL servers. Running that query on SQL 2000 does in fact give the exact same error message as listed in the question.

  • Koen Verbeeck

    SSC Guru

    Points: 258985

    Toreador (6/18/2014)


    You are working for a company that has uses SQL 2012 for their on site databases. A fellow DBA is trying to do a quick check on a database by running this query:

    I'm surprised that people are claiming that this statement proves the answer wrong. It's what led me straight to the correct answer.

    They use SQL 2012 for their on site databases. Why include the qualifier "on site"?

    The DBA is doing a quick link on "a database" - rather than "one of these databases".

    Ah - "on site" is included, because "a database" is somewhere else. So could be on a server hosted at a different site, in which case the answer is SQL2000. Or it could be in the cloud. Which is more likely? They're using SQL2012, so less likely that they're using SQL2000 elsewhere. Of course the company might have just bought another company who were 15 years out of date in their technology, but the balance of probabilities seemed to favour the cloud đŸ™‚

    Meh. Those are some wild assumptions.

    A quick link on a database. Ever connected to a SQL Azure database? The connection string is pretty obvious that it is Azure.

    Anyway, even if the assumptions are true, the SQL 2000 answer is as much likely as the other.

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • Neil Burton

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 22266

    Toreador (6/18/2014)


    You are working for a company that has uses SQL 2012 for their on site databases. A fellow DBA is trying to do a quick check on a database by running this query:

    I'm surprised that people are claiming that this statement proves the answer wrong. It's what led me straight to the correct answer.

    They use SQL 2012 for their on site databases. Why include the qualifier "on site"?

    The DBA is doing a quick link on "a database" - rather than "one of these databases".

    Ah - "on site" is included, because "a database" is somewhere else. So could be on a server hosted at a different site, in which case the answer is SQL2000. Or it could be in the cloud. Which is more likely? They're using SQL2012, so less likely that they're using SQL2000 elsewhere. Of course the company might have just bought another company who were 15 years out of date in their technology, but the balance of probabilities seemed to favour the cloud đŸ™‚

    I agree that it doesn't prove the answer wrong but it certainly goes no way to proving the answer right either. I'm pretty sure that a straw poll of users on here would find more people using 2012 and 2000 together than using 2012 and the cloud. The point is, that the question relies on some huge assumptions and one of those assumptions is effectively a coin toss.


    On two occasions I have been asked, "Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?" ... I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.
    —Charles Babbage, Passages from the Life of a Philosopher

    How to post a question to get the most help http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537

  • Gail Shaw

    SSC Guru

    Points: 1004484

    Koen Verbeeck (6/18/2014)


    The answer is incorrect.

    The question clearly states that the databases are on site. Thus, by the process of elimination, the corruption answer is the only one left.

    Except corruption would not cause that error. If the system tables tables were corrupted so badly that the name couldn't be resolved, at best you'd get error 823/824 error. If checksum wasn't enabled you'd get some other form of high severity message

    To get that message from 'corruption', you'd need someone to hack and explicitly modify the system resource DB and drop the view (or update the table backing sys.objects to remove the reference). That's not corruption, that's malicious intent.

    Gail Shaw
    Microsoft Certified Master: SQL Server, MVP, M.Sc (Comp Sci)
    SQL In The Wild: Discussions on DB performance with occasional diversions into recoverability

    We walk in the dark places no others will enter
    We stand on the bridge and no one may pass

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 70 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Login to reply