Kitchen Duty

  • Andy Warren

    SSC Guru

    Points: 119676

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item Kitchen Duty

  • call.copse

    SSCoach

    Points: 17083

    We are supposed to keep the kitchen tidy here. Many are too lazy and in traditional gender role play the women in the office tend to clean it up and complain occasionally about other's tidiness, at a fairly low level. I'm not really bothered and just look after my own stuff. I wouldn't mind kitchen cleaning duty too much at the ten minute level but definitely not as a full time job, even better paid than I am now. I am a developer thus a novelty seeker (to some extent).

    Here is a rare place (in my experience) that has no coffee round etiquette - it's every man for himself. It's kind of good because at least I get my drink my way when I want it. What you don't get is that time when everyone stops for a coffee and has a chat - we tend to just chat one to one mainly.

  • Koen Verbeeck

    SSC Guru

    Points: 258965

    First I thought this was yet another kitchen sale spam in the forums 🙂

    Personally I wouldn't like cleaning the kitchen as imo the cleaning crew should be responsible for that.

    In most companies I've been though you are expected to put your dirty dishes in the dishwasher. It's the least one can do.

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • Neil Burton

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 22134

    It depends on the size of the operation I suppose. If it's only a small place, then there may not be the budget for a cleaner but in larger shop then there's a good chance that there is somebody that is paid to clean up. That said, I think a roster of cleaning duties would encourage the everybody to keep the environment decent. In either situation there's no excuse for not cleaning up after yourself. The kitchen at our old site used to be left in some horrible states because of people who knew there was somebody who would come in and sort it. I mean how much effort does it take to put your cup in the dishwasher?


    On two occasions I have been asked, "Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?" ... I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.
    —Charles Babbage, Passages from the Life of a Philosopher

    How to post a question to get the most help http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537

  • Koen Verbeeck

    SSC Guru

    Points: 258965

    BWFC (6/16/2014)


    I mean how much effort does it take to put your cup in the dishwasher?

    Exactly. I make a point of always setting my cup (if I have one) in the dishwasher.

    Unless the dishwasher is already full or not yet unloaded. I'm not going to unload it, I do this already too much at home 🙂

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • David.Poole

    SSC Guru

    Points: 75311

    Formal cleaning of the kitchen is best left to cleaning staff.

    Keeping the kitchen area in a reasonable state, not leaving things festering in the sink etc is just basic decency and showing respect and consideration for your colleagues and your workplace.

    I dislike going into the workplace kitchen and seeing coffee and milk slopped over the side, a clogged sink and someones curry plate congealing in the gloop. I'd be up for hanging the culprits up by the ankles in the car park and inviting the cleaning staff to use them as a Piñata.

  • Dalkeith

    Hall of Fame

    Points: 3681

    First responsibility is to the tasks of my role.

    But I think I'm doing something wrong if I can't help out a bit in the office 15 minutes every week.

  • Michael Lysons

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6478

    Kitchen cleaning rota or "Incentive to keep the kitchen untidy because 11 months of the year I don't have to clean it" as I refer to it. As the 1 month is generally just one day before handover to the next month's lucky cleaner, it means the kitchen is in a more or less untidy state permanently.

    We've tried many things at our place for keeping the kitchen tidy. The only approach that works is for individuals to keep it tidy when they mess it up. I have a 100% success rate with this approach.

    Unfortunately, as evidenced by my first paragraph, my success is undermined by the stupid incentivisation scheme everyone else subscribes to 😛

  • Michael Lysons

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6478

    David.Poole (6/16/2014)


    Formal cleaning of the kitchen is best left to cleaning staff.

    Keeping the kitchen area in a reasonable state, not leaving things festering in the sink etc is just basic decency and showing respect and consideration for your colleagues and your workplace.

    I dislike going into the workplace kitchen and seeing coffee and milk slopped over the side, a clogged sink and someones curry plate congealing in the gloop. I'd be up for hanging the culprits up by the ankles in the car park and inviting the cleaning staff to use them as a Piñata.

    Yes. I am going to suggest this at our next Health and Safety meeting. 🙂

  • Gary Varga

    SSC Guru

    Points: 82166

    As an ordinary person, I certainly feel it is my duty to leave things as I find them. I have on occasions spilt some tea or milk etc. and it takes very little effort to wipe it up and (assuming a reusable clock or sponge) rinse it out. Yes, placing items in a dishwasher is a simple task (if only my family would learn). I would have no problem emptying a dishwasher although I do have to be careful that on a clients' site that they don't feel that I am not utilising my time employing my expertise as they expect. I tend to guage it, place by place.

    I do get infuriated by those small minorities who do nothing.

    I was once on a team where each of use would take turns getting a round of drinks in (zero cost i.e. free tea, coffee, water etc.). Some would get it more often than others but this tended to be a natural balance as those of us who got it more where the ones who drank more. There was one exception. One chap thought that it was beneath him to get drinks. After a couple of months of trying to cajole him into just getting one round in I realised that it was winding me up. So I stopped asking if he wanted one. When asked I explained to him that I felt it was unfair, it was winding me up and if he wasn't prepared to occasionally get a round in then I wouldn't get him one so that it no longer bothered me. He called me "petty". I didn't care.

    Gaz

    -- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!

  • Michael Lysons

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6478

    Gary Varga (6/16/2014)

    I was once on a team where each of use would take turns getting a round of drinks in (zero cost i.e. free tea, coffee, water etc.). Some would get it more often than others but this tended to be a natural balance as those of us who got it more where the ones who drank more. There was one exception. One chap thought that it was beneath him to get drinks. After a couple of months of trying to cajole him into just getting one round in I realised that it was winding me up. So I stopped asking if he wanted one. When asked I explained to him that I felt it was unfair, it was winding me up and if he wasn't prepared to occasionally get a round in then I wouldn't get him one so that it no longer bothered me. He called me "petty". I didn't care.

    Another one for stringing up as above!

  • Neil Burton

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 22134

    I was once on a team where each of use would take turns getting a round of drinks in (zero cost i.e. free tea, coffee, water etc.). Some would get it more often than others but this tended to be a natural balance as those of us who got it more where the ones who drank more. There was one exception. One chap thought that it was beneath him to get drinks. After a couple of months of trying to cajole him into just getting one round in I realised that it was winding me up. So I stopped asking if he wanted one. When asked I explained to him that I felt it was unfair, it was winding me up and if he wasn't prepared to occasionally get a round in then I wouldn't get him one so that it no longer bothered me. He called me "petty". I didn't care.

    The brewing up situation used to be more political than a United Nations meeting. I quickly decided that the easiest thing to do was stay out of the whole team rounds and just get myself a drink as and when I wanted one. I didn't expect anybody else to make a drink for me either. I'd watch other members of the team go a whole day without a drink because it wasn't their turn and they were waiting for somebody else to do it.


    On two occasions I have been asked, "Pray, Mr. Babbage, if you put into the machine wrong figures, will the right answers come out?" ... I am not able rightly to apprehend the kind of confusion of ideas that could provoke such a question.
    —Charles Babbage, Passages from the Life of a Philosopher

    How to post a question to get the most help http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537

  • Beatrix Kiddo

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 32407

    Where I work we have cleaners who come round several times a day to clear up and put the dishwasher on. Many people here (including me) can be trusted to clear up our mess and put our mugs in the dishwasher, but many more clearly think it's beneath them, and they leave the kitchens in a horrible state for the cleaners. It's embarrassing.

    I do hate tea and coffee rounds though. I like to get my own when I want it, so I prefer not to participate. Fortunately the rest of my team feels the same way. (I'd never accept a drink in a round if I wasn't going to take my turn getting them.) I have worked in awful offices where despite me never accepting a drink in a round, they still expected me to "do my fair share" and get the drinks in for everybody else. I hated that. I could understand it if I'd been happily accepting cups of tea from them, but I hadn't so it just felt like bullying.

    I'd watch other members of the team go a whole day without a drink because it wasn't their turn and they were waiting for somebody else to do it.

    Yeah, the place I mentioned was like that; it was pathetic.

  • Beatrix Kiddo

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 32407

    [sorry]

  • Gary Varga

    SSC Guru

    Points: 82166

    It's just like rounds at the bar: it is great when you don't bother count as some days you are surprised how little money you have left in your wallet and other days surprised by how much. The best teams that I have worked with know who needs a break, who needs to stay at the keyboard, who has got the slack and it is the mature and friendly team that act accordingly.

    I find that brewing politics only reflects team politics anyway :unsure:

    Gaz

    -- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 40 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Login to reply