Great Writers Get Hired

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 997112

    Grant Fritchey wrote:

    Don't put your face in them. I stopped recording videos about 9 months ago. I'm going to get back on it, but change the format a bit. No more "video" just a picture (or pictures) with voice over and then demos & screen captures. No one wants to look at my ugly mug either.

    Heh... we both have a face for radio. 😀

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".
    "Dear Lord... I'm a DBA so please give me patience because, if you give me strength, I'm going to need bail money too!"

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 997112

    Grant Fritchey wrote:

    Robert Sterbal wrote:

    I just asked someone else in this thread:

    What would be a good way to get presenters to record their presentation the day before they gave it?

    Not sure that's always practical. For example, I'm frequently traveling the day before I give a presentation. Recording it on a plane would be awkward for all involved.

    The other thing is that, if it were practical, there would be no need to attend to give the presentation.  That would destroy some of the best reasons to attend such an event... networking, commiseration, and rampant beer drinking afterwards.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".
    "Dear Lord... I'm a DBA so please give me patience because, if you give me strength, I'm going to need bail money too!"

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • ninken

    Newbie

    Points: 7

    The ways to stand out on the resume is becoming more and more difficult in modern times.

    I agree being a great writer will help you stand out only if you can get it read by a human.

    First part of the problem with modern day applicants is they have to deal with an AI based filter.

    This limits your ability to make your Resume unique, like having  Infographic resume, which I did one time, but had to revert back to the boring resume formats. This is because the auto AI resume readers have trouble parsing them. These systems want  plain text file resume to end up in someone database.  You are actually better writing your resume in notepad and formatting it to be flexible with word wrap.

    These AI base filters actually don't care what college you went to.

    They are out to simply find as many keywords that are found on the job posting, before passing your information forward.

    Now you have moved on to human filter or head hunter, most employers have shifted work to them to bring them applicants .

    Unfortunately these AI don't do a good job filter out old/inactive Job Applications even after you withdrew them from Online Job sites. "Hey head hunters stop calling me"

    Then you have Geo location issues, people from around the world apply, but most job postings do not give the conditions of employment.  If it a on site in a office location, you left the head hunter shifting through them to find someone local hopefully. Hey  stop calling me from 2,000 miles away, for a on site job!

    Now at some point someone will actually read maybe the first line of your resume scanning for your phone number, or simply clicks on the database parsed phone number to call your directly from a headset.

    Once contact is made the next steps they may have a Skype chat, and taking some type of online skill test with question that may never apply with your actual job. Then the head hunter will finally give you some information about the job you did not know you applied for and finally pass your information to the employer, you also maybe shocked to find out that the job it's self was not what you were looking for another example is a contact based job.

    So what you are left with is big mess.

    My suggestion is bypass the process and head hunters. Find your employers that may need your skill set.

    Use social networking like linked in, find the human in that organization. Then communicate to them directly vs indirectly.

    You would also be avoiding putting your personal out into public databases. A resume contains allot of person information that can be used for identity thief, or abused by head hunts. A hacker is always looking for someone who makes money.

     

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 997112

    I have to tell you that if you work with the right recruiter, you don't have to worry about AI HR bots, HR people, or whatever.  A lot of people don't realize it but the good recruiters keep the wheels from falling off this industry.

    Of course, you'd better know what the heck you're talking about and know the position you're applying for.  Don't even think about stretching the truth or flat out lying on your resume.  It'll follow you forever because it's actually a very small world we live in.  It's amazing what absolute honesty does especially in the job search business.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".
    "Dear Lord... I'm a DBA so please give me patience because, if you give me strength, I'm going to need bail money too!"

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • MVDBA (Mike Vessey)

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 21757

    Grant Fritchey wrote:

    Robert Sterbal wrote:

    I just asked someone else in this thread:

    What would be a good way to get presenters to record their presentation the day before they gave it?

    Not sure that's always practical. For example, I'm frequently traveling the day before I give a presentation. Recording it on a plane would be awkward for all involved.

    my colleague asks his wife (a psychologist) to interview him every night for a week before the big deal... it's his trick, but find your own. 🙂

     

    MVDBA

  • Robert Sterbal

    SSChampion

    Points: 10995

    I'm always puzzled as to ask the question I had in this forum. I know a lot of people don't want to record their presentations, but I'm looking for a good way of letting the thousands of speakers at SQL Saturdays to consider recording their presentations. Should I tweet them? Should I point them to all of the currently recorded material? Should I get statistics on how many more people will access their content?

    Should I just ask elsewhere?

    412-977-3526 call/text

  • Grant Fritchey

    SSC Guru

    Points: 396692

    Robert Sterbal wrote:

    I'm always puzzled as to ask the question I had in this forum. I know a lot of people don't want to record their presentations, but I'm looking for a good way of letting the thousands of speakers at SQL Saturdays to consider recording their presentations. Should I tweet them? Should I point them to all of the currently recorded material? Should I get statistics on how many more people will access their content?

    Should I just ask elsewhere?

    A good place to also ask this question (I think this is a fine place too) would be the community Slack. There's a SQLSaturday channel. You'll get direct access to quite a few speakers and even more organizers through that.

    There are a whole slew of potential resistance to the idea. First up, does the speaker have screen capture software? Second, is the session meant to be interactive, which won't translate? Is the speaker more interested in protecting their IP so they control when/how it gets accessed? Is it already recorded and published somewhere? Where does this get hosted, the PASS Youtube channel? Who owns the copyright if it's hosted by PASS?

    I get the concept. Let's share this stuff further than simply through a one-off at an event only 150 people attend and maybe 25 people see. It's just that, like anything, the devil is in the details.

    ----------------------------------------------------
    The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood...
    Theodore Roosevelt

    The Scary DBA
    Author of: SQL Server 2017 Query Performance Tuning, 5th Edition and SQL Server Execution Plans, 3rd Edition
    Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software

  • Rod at work

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 33412

    Steve Jones - SSC Editor wrote:

    Rod at work wrote:

    Good article, Steve. At first I thought it would be much the same as I see everywhere, at this time of the year. However, you brought up two important things. One to be a good writer, of resumes/CVs. The other to apply for a position early, because HR people or hiring managers, probably get tired after reading through a 100+ resumes. I'd never thought of that before. Great advise!

    It does make me wonder though, about those job postings I see which stay open for long periods of time. Why do they stay open for long periods of time? I have seen two reasons for job postings staying open for a long time. I work in State government and I know that basically speaking all job postings stay open for a long time, just because State government is government - i.e.: it moves slowly. The second reason I witnessed at my previous job, many years ago. We had an opening and wanted one particular person to apply for it. It took him a while to get around to applying, but once he did then we moved quicker. I don't condone that activity now; it just was what we did.

    But I'm guessing there are other reasons for some jobs to stay open for several weeks or even a few months. I've seen this for large companies and even at the Federal government level. What are the reasons for that?

    There are rules. For example, at Redgate, I think we need to post a job for a few weeks.

    I think plenty get posted early, and then people forget or they don't take them down, even though they've got resumes.

    OK, that makes sense. I can see how some, including HR people, just might get too busy to take down a want ad.

    Kindest Regards, Rod Connect with me on LinkedIn.

  • Rod at work

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 33412

    Jeff Moden wrote:

    I have to tell you that if you work with the right recruiter, you don't have to worry about AI HR bots, HR people, or whatever.  A lot of people don't realize it but the good recruiters keep the wheels from falling off this industry.

    Jeff, how do you find the right recruiter?

    Kindest Regards, Rod Connect with me on LinkedIn.

  • Eric M Russell

    SSC Guru

    Points: 125100

    Rod at work wrote:

    Jeff Moden wrote:

    I have to tell you that if you work with the right recruiter, you don't have to worry about AI HR bots, HR people, or whatever.  A lot of people don't realize it but the good recruiters keep the wheels from falling off this industry.

    Jeff, how do you find the right recruiter?

    At least for me, the best job recruiters are the internal ones. It seems like every past job or interview that I recall as a bust was facilitated by a 3rd party recruiter. However, I've generally had good experiences when working with internal talent scouts and hiring managers directly. There have been occasions where I've spent an hour speaking on the phone with the IT director or team lead, and it led to my accepting a position that lasted for years. Maybe that's because the best organizations to work for invest the extra time and resources to manage the recruiting process themselves.

    The vast majority of career and resume writing advice you see on the web is targeted toward first time job seekers. It's basically: follow this standard resume template, "do this", "please don't do that", and here's the perfect answer that you (and the other 100 identical candidates) can give for the top 3 questions you might (but probably won't) get asked.

    Well, if you're an experienced professional at the mid point or Act II of your career, then it's a whole different ball game. As for how to make your resume stand out when a recruiter is skimming through a stack of 100 resumes - it's about articulating clearly and concisely what distinct experiences and talents you bring to the table. It's not about where you're from, what you've studied, or how eager you are to please, - it's more about what you've actually done, and how you can you add value to the organization starting on day 1. Don't just list your past positions, projects, and skillset - tell them about it. It doesn't fit into the standard resume format, but it works.

    "Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Instead, seek what they sought." - Matsuo Basho

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