Data Professionals at Work Book

Jason Brimhall, 2018-11-29

Working as a Data Professional

An old friend Malathi Mahadevan (b | t) asked me one day if I would be interested in helping with her first book project. Anybody who has participated in the writing of a book knows this can be a rather daunting task – no matter the level of participation. Certainly, the principal author on a book has the grunt of the work, but there is plenty of work to be done for all.

I must say, I gladly accepted the opportunity. Firstly, this was a friend asking. Secondly, I liked the topic and method Mala had chosen. Lastly, I sometimes enjoy a little challenge. Ok, I probably enjoy challenges a little more than the average Joe.

Wowzas

Mala was able to gather quite a stunning group of people together to bring this book to reality. Check out this list (hyperlinks take you to the individuals chapter at Safari): Mindy Curnutt, Julie Smith, Kenneth Fisher, Andy Leonard, Jes Borland, Kevin Feasel, Ginger Grant, Vicky Harp, Kendra Little, Jason Brimhall, Tim Costello, Andy Mallon, Steph Locke, Jonathan Stewart, Joseph Sack, John Q. Martin, John Morehouse, Kathi Kellenberger, Argenis Fernandez, Kirsten Benzel, Tracy Boggiano, Dave Walden, Matt Gordon, Jimmy May, Drew Furgiuele, Marlon Ribunal, Kevin Kline and Joseph Fleming.

Kevin Kline out of that bunch contributed the foreword. If you follow the links, you will notice that the authors appear in order of their chapters.

All of these authors came together to share experiences and insights into the world of a data professional. None of the stories are the same. None of the experiences are the same (not on the micro level anyway). That said, all of the stories do bring the reader an opportunity to learn from the people that have been there and experienced some cool stuff in their careers.

Not only will you encounter some interesting stories, but I believe you will also encounter some interesting insight into some of the contributors. Each person unravels a little bit of their own unique personality while trying to share their passion and love for this field we all excel at (at least sometimes).

If you read closely enough, you might even find a steamy romance hidden between the covers of the book. Then again, maybe that can only be found on a Little blog.

Oh, did you know you can also reach each of the authors on twitter? Check out this list here! Missing from the list is Kevin Kline, but you can find him on twitter here.

 

Go Get the Book!

With so much great stuff to learn from so many awesome people, you must be asking where you can find the book?

That’s easy! Head on over to Amazon and snag the book (in ebook or paper formats) now! Even with sooo many people contributing to this book, it is a rather short read, coming in at just under 400 pages. It’s also lightweight enough, it could be easily carried around during the lunch break or to and from work.

 

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