A Tale of Two Sandy Bridge Laptops

Glenn Berry, 2011-06-21

I recently bought a new teaching and presentation laptop, which is a Toshiba Portege R835-P55X, which I found at the Microsoft Store in Park Meadows Mall in Lone Tree, CO. This machine has a dual-core 2.3GHz Core i5-2410M, that also has Hyper-threading and Turbo Boost 2.0. It uses the integrated Intel HD graphics, which work perfectly well for business use.

This is a replacement for the very successful Portege R705 line from 2010, which was my previous teaching machine. The new machine looks exactly like my older R705, and it still weighs only 3.2 pounds. The main difference is that it has about 50% more CPU horsepower and significantly better battery life, along with a USB 3.0 port and 6Gbps SATA III support. On the downside, the screen resolution is only 1366 x 768.

The new machine was only $799, but I have about $350 invested in improving it a bit. First, I replaced the two 2GB sticks of RAM with two 4GB sticks of RAM. Second, I put a 6Gbps 128GB Crucial RealSSD C300 solid state drive in it to replace the stock 5400rpm 640GB hard drive. Finally, I put a 32GB PNY Category 10 Micro SHDC card in to have a little more storage space.

After these improvements, here are some metrics and benchmarks on this machine:

image

Windows Experience Index on Toshiba Portege R835-P55X

image

CPU-Z on Toshiba Portege R835-P55X

image

Geekbench on Toshiba Portege R835-P55X

The second machine is a loaner machine that I am using at my new job. It is a Dell Latitude E6420, with a quad-core 2.2GHz Core i7-2720QM, that also has Hyper-threading and Turbo Boost 2.0. This machine only has a single 4GB stick of RAM, and it has 7200rpm 500GB hard drive. It uses the integrated Intel HD graphics, which work perfectly well for business use.

image

Windows Experience Index on Dell Latitude E6420

image

CPU-Z on Dell Latitude E6420

image

Geekbench on Dell Latitude E6420

Having only one stick of RAM really hurts the Latitude E6420 in its Memory scores in Geekbench. It day-to-day usage, having a conventional hard drive (even a 7200 rpm model) makes a huge difference (in a bad way) compared to the Crucial SSD in the little Toshiba Portege. Really, once you have an SSD in a laptop, a conventional hard drive feels painfully slow.

Rate

Share

Share

Rate

Related content

Database Mirroring FAQ: Can a 2008 SQL instance be used as the witness for a 2005 database mirroring setup?

Question: Can a 2008 SQL instance be used as the witness for a 2005 database mirroring setup? This question was sent to me via email. My reply follows. Can a 2008 SQL instance be used as the witness for a 2005 database mirroring setup? Databases to be mirrored are currently running on 2005 SQL instances but will be upgraded to 2008 SQL in the near future.

Robert Davis

2009-02-23

1,567 reads

Networking – Part 4

You may want to read Part 1 , Part 2 , and Part 3 before continuing. This time around I’d like to talk about social networking. We’ll start with social networking. Facebook, MySpace, and Twitter are all good examples of using technology to let…

Andy Warren

2009-02-17

1,530 reads

Speaking at Community Events – More Thoughts

Last week I posted Speaking at Community Events – Time to Raise the Bar?, a first cut at talking about to what degree we should require experience for speakers at events like SQLSaturday as well as when it might be appropriate to add additional focus/limitations on the presentations that are accepted. I’ve got a few more thoughts on the topic this week, and I look forward to your comments.

Andy Warren

2009-02-13

360 reads