SQLServerCentral Article

Troubleshooting Dynamic SQL

,

Introduction

If you have

inherited an application that generates dynamic SQL and the last upgrade is

causing blocking it can be a difficult problem to solve. However with these two

SQL stored procedures, a capture job, some common sense, and SQL Query analyzer

you can find that elusive “rogue” SQL statement.

Setting up the Capture Job

The kill

root blocker SQL procedure follows the root blocker capture procedure. Users

issuing the blocking query will be affected however other will not.

The output

of the stored procedure “sp_find_root_blocker2” should be directed to a text

file for later review.

Setting up a Capture Alert

In addition

to a Capture Job you can also set up a capture alert

Reading the captured data

This is an example of the

captured root blocker data. In this case a single statement appeared four time

in the course of an hour.

'Check_For_Root_Blocker' : Step 1, 'Check for Blocker' : Began Executing 2003-08-19 15:05:00
No processes are currently blocked [SQLSTATE 01000]
Job 'Check_For_Root_Blocker' : Step 1, 'Check for Blocker' : Began Executing 2003-08-19 15:10:00
spid  status                         loginame             hostname             blk db         cmd              waittype
73     runnable                       ANGEL5SESSIONS       B2R05                0  ANGELDB2   DELETE           0000
EventTypeParameters EventInfo                                                                                                                                                                 
Event0          DELETE FROM LSN_LOGS WHERE ENTRY_ID IN (SELECT ENTRY_ID FROM LSN_ENTRIES WHERE LSN_ENTRIES.COURSE_ID = '200304FABR   RCMPSC101 001' AND LSN_ENTRIES.PARENT_ID = 'DELETED')
Job 'Check_For_Root_Blocker' : Step 1, 'Check for Blocker' : Began Executing 2003-08-19 15:15:00
No processes are currently blocked [SQLSTATE 01000]
Job 'Check_For_Root_Blocker' : Step 1, 'Check for Blocker' : Began Executing 2003-08-19 15:20:00
No processes are currently blocked [SQLSTATE 01000]
Job 'Check_For_Root_Blocker' : Step 1, 'Check for Blocker' : Began Executing
2003-08-19 15:25:01
spid  status                         loginame             hostname             blk db         cmd              waittype
66    sleeping                       ANGEL5SESSIONS       B2R05                0  ANGELDB2   DELETE           0208
66     runnable                       ANGEL5SESSIONS       B2R05                0 ANGELDB2   DELETE           0000
EventTypeParameters EventInfo                                               
Event0          DELETE FROM LSN_LOGS WHERE ENTRY_ID = '07863204DB4O1128'
Job 'Check_For_Root_Blocker' : Step 1, 'Check for Blocker' : Began Executing 2003-08-19 15:30:00
No processes are currently blocked [SQLSTATE 01000]

Analyzing the

Captured Query

When you

have captured a root blocking statement copy and paste the query in SQL Query

Analyzer referencing the effected database. You should either press CNTL+L or

navigate to “Query” then “Display Estimated Execution Plan” and click.

The SQL

statement “DELETE FROM LSN_LOGS WHERE ENTRY_ID IN (SELECT ENTRY_ID FROM

LSN_ENTRIES WHERE LSN_ENTRIES.COURSE_ID = '200304FABR   RCMPSC101 001' AND

LSN_ENTRIES.PARENT_ID = 'DELETED')” appeared four times in the course on an

hour additionally other statements referencing the “ENTRY_ID” column on the

LSN_LOGS table appeared. The big clue is multiple SQL statements referencing

the same type of statement usually a delete or an update, which results in a

cluster index or table scan using exclusive locks.

This DELETE

statement with a sub query caused a nested loop join of a 10 million row table

to a eight hundred thousand table, clearly there was room for improvement. A I

mentioned previously, a delete statement uses exclusive locks preventing all

users not using uncommitted reads (dirty reads) from accessing the table.

Implementing a

Solution

In this

case the standard technique of applying indexes to both side of a join worked

well. One index was added to the “LSN_LOGS” side of the join and the join type

changed from Nested Join, Cluster Index Scan to Hash Join, Index Seek with

almost an order of magnitude improvement in speed. This was verified by running

the “Display Estimated Execution Plan” again after the change.

Sp_find_root_blocker2

This stored

procedure will capture the details related to the head of the blocking chain.

It should be placed in the MASTER database.

if exists
(select * from dbo.sysobjects where id = object_id(N'[dbo].[sp_find_root_blocker2]')
and OBJECTPROPERTY(id, N'IsProcedure') = 1)
drop procedure [dbo].[sp_find_root_blocker2]
GO
 
SET
QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON 
GO
SET
ANSI_NULLS ON 
GO
 
CREATE
PROCEDURE sp_find_root_blocker2
/*
 
Object:
sp_find_root_blocker
Description:
Finds the root offender(s) in the chain(s) of blocked processes
 
Usage:
sp_find_root_blocker 
 
Returns:
spid of the root blocking process (returns the last one if there are
multiple)
 
 
Example:
sp_find_root_blocker
 
 
*/AS
 
IF EXISTS
(SELECT * FROM master..sysprocesses p1 JOIN master..sysprocesses p2 ON
(p1.spid=p2.blocked)) BEGIN
  DECLARE
@spid int
 
  SELECT
@spid=p1.spid  -- Get the _last_ prime offender
  FROM
master..sysprocesses p1 JOIN master..sysprocesses p2 ON (p1.spid=p2.blocked)
  WHERE
p1.blocked=0
 
  SELECT          p1.spid,
             
          p1.status, 
                        loginame=LEFT(p1.loginame,20),
                        hostname=substring(p1.hostname,1,20),
           
            blk=CONVERT(char(3),p1.blocked),
            db=LEFT(db_name(p1.dbid),10),
                        p1.cmd,
                        p1.waittype
    FROM
master..sysprocesses p1 JOIN master..sysprocesses p2 ON (p1.spid=p2.blocked)
    WHERE
p1.blocked=0
  DBCC
INPUTBUFFER(@spid)
 
RETURN(@spid)  -- Return the last root block
END ELSE
BEGIN
  PRINT
'No processes are currently blocked'
 
RETURN(0)
END
 
RETURN 0
 
 
GO
SET
QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF 
GO
SET
ANSI_NULLS ON 
GO

Sp_Kill_Root_Blocker

This stored procedure will kill the head of the blocking chain. It should be placed in the MASTER database.
if exists
(select * from dbo.sysobjects where id =
object_id(N'[dbo].[sp_kill_root_blocker]') and OBJECTPROPERTY(id,
N'IsProcedure') = 1)
drop
procedure [dbo].[sp_kill_root_blocker]
GO
 
SET
QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF 
GO
SET
ANSI_NULLS ON 
GO
 
CREATE
PROCEDURE sp_kill_root_blocker
/*
 
Object:
sp_kill_root_blocker
 
Description:
Finds the root offender(s) in the chain(s) of blocked processes and kills
them
 
Usage:
exec sp_kill_root_blocker 
 
*/AS
 
WHILE
EXISTS (SELECT * FROM master..sysprocesses p1 JOIN master..sysprocesses p2 ON
(p1.spid=p2.blocked)) 
            BEGIN
            DECLARE
@spid int
            DECLARE
@KILLSTATE varchar(32)
 
            SELECT 
@spid=p1.spid
            FROM
master..sysprocesses p1 JOIN master..sysprocesses p2 ON (p1.spid=p2.blocked)
            WHERE
p1.blocked=0
            select
@KILLSTATE = 'KILL ' + CONVERT(char, @spid)
            print
@KILLSTATE
            exec(@KILLSTATE
)
            END
 
 
GO
SET
QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF 
GO
SET
ANSI_NULLS ON
GO

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