Working Predictable Hours

  • Comments posted to this topic are about the item Working Predictable Hours

  • excellent post as always.

    really struck a chord with me. I used to work all the hours available.

    a few life events later and I now do my hours and have a life outside of work. I give my employer an honest weeks work and am contactable for emergencies but now living is more important than working.

    we all learn eventually

  • Many years ago at one point in 1974 I started a shop from scratch for a company with 24-hour operations.  In those days of CRT terminals I had 5 Teamsters union operators, chosen by seniority, working staggered shifts, and when anything went wrong I had to get up and commute about 15 miles to handle problems.  There were no remote connections, so if a problem couldn't be handled by talking to non-technical union employees, I had to go.

    Yes, those hours were predictable. That's how you learn that software quality really does count.

    I fondly remember my third-shift guy who would read to me line-by-line from the CRT console:

    "It says to me", (reads a line)

    I tell him what to type in.

    "And then it says to me", (reads another line)

    I tell him what to type in next.

    Rest In Peace, Marvin.  We made it happen.

     

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 4 days ago by  skeleton567. Reason: just another thought

    Rick

    I may not be good, but I'm slow.

    The only thing worse than being an influencer
    is believing one.

  • Reported in The Economist just last week: "Working 55 hours or more a week is 'a serious health hazard' according to the World Health Organisation, in a first global analysis of the effects of working long hours. Working at least 55 hours is associated with higher risks of stroke and heart disease, compared with working 35-40 hours. The disease burden is significant in men, people living in East and South-East Asia, and middle-aged or older workers."

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 3 days ago by  JRuss.

    Trying to figure out the world of SQL as marketing consultant for SQL Solutions Group https://sqlsolutionsgroup.com/

  • I tend to agree, though I think at times it's not bad.

     

    It is, however, not sustainable for a healthy lifestyle and highly productive work for the vast majority of people.

  • JRuss wrote:

    Reported in The Economist just last week: "Working 55 hours or more a week is 'a serious health hazard' according to the World Health Organisation, in a first global analysis of the effects of working long hours. Working at least 55 hours is associated with higher risks of stroke and heart disease, compared with working 35-40 hours. The disease burden is significant in men, people living in East and South-East Asia, and middle-aged or older workers."

    Heh... well, ok!  At least now I know what the hell happened to me! 😀

    Actually, I did read that same article and I was totally gob-smacked by it.  I spend way too much time working but... I do like the work I do and that might be why it hasn't actually killed me (yet).

     

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".
    "Dear Lord... I'm a DBA so please give me patience because, if you give me strength, I'm going to need bail money too!"

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • Jeff Moden wrote:

    JRuss wrote:

    Reported in The Economist just last week: "Working 55 hours or more a week is 'a serious health hazard' according to the World Health Organisation, in a first global analysis of the effects of working long hours. Working at least 55 hours is associated with higher risks of stroke and heart disease, compared with working 35-40 hours. The disease burden is significant in men, people living in East and South-East Asia, and middle-aged or older workers."

    Heh... well, ok!  At least now I know what the hell happened to me! 😀

    Actually, I did read that same article and I was totally gob-smacked by it.  I spend way too much time working but... I do like the work I do and that might be why it hasn't actually killed me (yet).

    I would think enjoying what you do would help mitigate the negative effects. Hopefully would be less stressful, at least.

    Trying to figure out the world of SQL as marketing consultant for SQL Solutions Group https://sqlsolutionsgroup.com/

  • A teenager who was crazy about sound and recordings, who payed with mixing and recording on hid DIY home equipment, met a professional sound engineer, which brought the youngster to to his professional sound studio.

    the teenager was amazed by all the equipment, mixing table, and all the stuff.

    In an excitement of the moment the only thing he could say: "... and they pay you for this???"

    _____________
    Code for TallyGenerator

  • Jeff Moden wrote:

    JRuss wrote:

    Reported in The Economist just last week: "Working 55 hours or more a week is 'a serious health hazard' according to the World Health Organisation, in a first global analysis of the effects of working long hours. Working at least 55 hours is associated with higher risks of stroke and heart disease, compared with working 35-40 hours. The disease burden is significant in men, people living in East and South-East Asia, and middle-aged or older workers."

    Heh... well, ok!  At least now I know what the hell happened to me! 😀

    Actually, I did read that same article and I was totally gob-smacked by it.  I spend way too much time working but... I do like the work I do and that might be why it hasn't actually killed me (yet).

    I must have been dead for years and just didn't know it.  Loved my work, just not some of the people I worked for/with.  But all is good now.

     

    Rick

    I may not be good, but I'm slow.

    The only thing worse than being an influencer
    is believing one.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Login to reply