Which version of SQL should I use?

  • I see SQL as a query language, used to store and retrieve data. However, there are now many versions of new words with different features. Now I am using SQL to manage school data. So now which version should I use? Please give me some advice.

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  • curtisharrington wrote:

    Now I am using SQL to manage school data.

    What are you currently using?

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)
    Intro to Tally Tables and Functions

  • curtisharrington wrote:

    I see SQL as a query language, used to store and retrieve data. However, there are now many versions of new words with different features. Now I am using SQL to manage school data. So now which version should I use? Please give me some advice.

    ANSI-SQL is the international standard.

    Microsoft has implemented that, and extended the language as T-SQL.  Oracle has done the same thing as PL-SQL.  Each RDMS has implemented various extensions to the original language.

    The RDMS you choose determines what dialect of SQL  is available to you.

    Choosing an RDMS is probably more dependent upon costs, time to learn the RDMS, and your infrastructure.

     

    When you say "there are now many versions of new words with different features", what specifically are you referring to?

    The word SELECT is universal to all dialects.  However, TRY_CONVERT is specific to T-SQL (Microsoft)

    Michael L John
    If you assassinate a DBA, would you pull a trigger?
    To properly post on a forum:
    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/61537/

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