What was that field name?

  • Dave62

    SSCertifiable

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    Comments posted to this topic are about the item What was that field name?

  • Hardy21

    SSCrazy Eights

    Points: 9708

    Nice one.

    When I observed this feature, I was happy 🙂

    Thanks

  • pmadhavapeddi22

    SSCertifiable

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    Learnt something new today 🙂

  • Hany Helmy

    SSChampion

    Points: 13291

    Easy, another fast way (but maybe not the fastest), just highlight the table then press Alt + F1 will give you all table structure, definition, columns names, data types, Identity fields (if any) and lot more.

  • Koen Verbeeck

    SSC Guru

    Points: 258859

    Nice question. I use SQLPrompt by Redgate so I immediately get all the column names and data types through the IntelliSense without even doing anything 😎 :w00t:

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • Hardy21

    SSCrazy Eights

    Points: 9708

    Koen Verbeeck (8/6/2014)


    Nice question. I use SQLPrompt by Redgate so I immediately get all the column names and data types through the IntelliSense without even doing anything 😎 :w00t:

    Same here 😛

    Thanks

  • Iulian -207023

    SSCertifiable

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    Nice one , thank you for the question

  • Carlo Romagnano

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 21665

    I noticed it for columns, tables and functions, but I happily surprised for star!

    Good!

    😀

  • pmadhavapeddi22

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5306

    Hany Helmy (8/6/2014)


    Easy, another fast way (but maybe not the fastest), just highlight the table then press Alt + F1 will give you all table structure, definition, columns names, data types, Identity fields (if any) and lot more.

    My ususal practice is alt + F1 (I though this option will be there in the list of answers but no ;-))

  • uravindarreddy

    Ten Centuries

    Points: 1382

    A very nice question! This helps a lot!

    😀

  • Carlo Romagnano

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 21665

    Wonderfull!!!

    It, also, works with subquery:

    SELECT * FROM (

    SELECT MAX(object_id) AS ID,MAX(name) AS NAME FROM sys.objects

    ) AS o

    But in this case it states a wrong type for column NAME(int,null)

  • Sebastian Zeller

    Valued Member

    Points: 71

    You could also use a simple table alias to choose from the list of columns 🙂

    Select *

    FROM dbo.Customers c

    WHERE c.

  • Toreador

    SSChampion

    Points: 11220

    I knew what the answer was going to be, so got it right.

    But this method will only tell you if a column is (for instance) varchar. It doesn't tell you its precision. To see that the quickest way is to highlight the table name and press Alt-F1. Of the options given, Object Explorer is the only one that includes this information.

  • peter.row

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4284

    In typical SQL style actually the answer is "it depends" - on how you work.

    Hovering the mouse may be quick but not that helpful since as soon as you start typing the list tooltip disappears so if you want more than one from a table with quite a few fields and you really can't remember then that blows that out the water.

    I have widescreen monitors (doesn't everyone nowadays?) at 1920 odd res so I have object explorer permanently pinned open. Further when I am working with a particular database (I'm a software dev) I expand Management Studio and typically have either tables or the programmability sections (or both) expanded so for me at wors it is a little bit of a scroll and a couple of clicks to get all the required information (including precision as someone else mentioned).

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