Versatile or Jack of all trades

  • Anywhere I worked, I would have been glad to have someone like Nitin's business analyst somewhere around. And I've been lucky, in most of the places I've worked, there have been several people like that.  It's oftm useful to have a specialised expert around too. I've often filled both roles at once.
     
    Would I like to be like that myself?  Yes, of course I would!  And often I have been like it, and usually I loved it.  Helping people is one of the best ways to learn things (it's also the best way to teach things if one does it right). It's also something that some people remember and make sure you know they remember, and that can be oh so wonderful.

    Tom

  • Jeff Moden - Tuesday, January 22, 2019 11:02 AM

    There's no question that the wrong kind of person with the drive as the person we're talking about could actually destroy well tuned successful teams.  I've actually seen that happen.  When it comes to hiring people for any walk, culture and fit are (or should be) two of the greatest considerations.  I wouldn't summarily dismiss the notion of hiring a go-getter just because they are a go-getter but I also wouldn't automatically hire one.  "Must look eye". 😀  In other words, "It Depends".

    I think it'spretty easy to detect who will the destructive type and who won't, Jeff.  I've come across the destructive type, and they were obvious in the first 5 minutes of the interview, so it's easy to avoid recruiting them.  Actually, for most it's obvious that they are that type just from reading the CV, so there's not even anty wasted interview time.
    Of course I have had to cope with them - back in the days when either I didn't get a vote as to who was taken on or when  I arrived in the company after the person was taken on; it was always a nightmare until I could make the sane part of management realise what was going on (which once wasn't fast enough - the company went bust).  But I'll name neither the company nor the person - I may havegot it wrong.

    Tom

  • below86 - Tuesday, January 22, 2019 11:14 AM

    Rod at work - Tuesday, January 22, 2019 8:36 AM

    Nitin, I would prefer to work with someone like the senior Business Analyst you described. And even more so, I'd rather be like her. (I don't believe I am.) She seems to be in a rare breed of people like that. I don't know how large your organization is, but in my experience is that large organizations tend to not care for people being too versatile. Better that everyone keep to the role they've been assigned or at least are perceived to be in.

    I agree  Rod, only I think you got one letter wrong in your last sentence.  "Better that everyone keep to the hole they've been assigned or at least are perceived to be in."😀

    😀 😀 😀 That's good, below86!

    Kindest Regards, Rod Connect with me on LinkedIn.

  • My thoughts are that someone saying that to hire this person to do the job because others become dependent on her is a smoke-screen.  There is something else at play and this is nothing more than an excuse.
    To not hire someone who is helpful and competent is just cutting your own nose off to spite your face.  
    Chances are that this lady hurt the feelings of the person who made this comment by coming up with a solution that he didn't or he saw her as a threat to a role he wanted for himself or someone he knew.

    A lack of planning on your part does not constitute an emergency on mine.

  • TomThomson - Tuesday, January 22, 2019 12:19 PM

    Jeff Moden - Tuesday, January 22, 2019 11:02 AM

    There's no question that the wrong kind of person with the drive as the person we're talking about could actually destroy well tuned successful teams.  I've actually seen that happen.  When it comes to hiring people for any walk, culture and fit are (or should be) two of the greatest considerations.  I wouldn't summarily dismiss the notion of hiring a go-getter just because they are a go-getter but I also wouldn't automatically hire one.  "Must look eye". 😀  In other words, "It Depends".

    I think it'spretty easy to detect who will the destructive type and who won't, Jeff.  I've come across the destructive type, and they were obvious in the first 5 minutes of the interview, so it's easy to avoid recruiting them.  Actually, for most it's obvious that they are that type just from reading the CV, so there's not even anty wasted interview time.
    Of course I have had to cope with them - back in the days when either I didn't get a vote as to who was taken on or when  I arrived in the company after the person was taken on; it was always a nightmare until I could make the sane part of management realise what was going on (which once wasn't fast enough - the company went bust).  But I'll name neither the company nor the person - I may havegot it wrong.

    Heh... absolutely correct, Tom.  You can normally tell when they take the 2x4 out of their pocket and put it on their shoulder during the interview. 😀

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)
    Intro to Tally Tables and Functions

  • Jeff Moden - Tuesday, January 29, 2019 7:53 PM

    Heh... absolutely correct, Tom.  You can normally tell when they take the 2x4 out of their pocket and put it on their shoulder during the interview. 😀

    I presume this not the same clue-by-four that's usually referred to as a LART?  They can be quite useful.

  • Donna Kelly - Monday, February 4, 2019 3:46 PM

    Jeff Moden - Tuesday, January 29, 2019 7:53 PM

    Heh... absolutely correct, Tom.  You can normally tell when they take the 2x4 out of their pocket and put it on their shoulder during the interview. 😀

    I presume this not the same clue-by-four that's usually referred to as a LART?  They can be quite useful.

    Correct.  Not the same thing as I was talking about. As you know, my LART consists of a different bit of tooling.

    My reference to the 2x4 is the massive chip that some people carry on their shoulders whether they be an interviewee or an interviewer.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)
    Intro to Tally Tables and Functions

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