The Soft Skill of Respect

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 717406

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item The Soft Skill of Respect

  • Toby Harman

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4129

    Our CTO wrote an article on Forbes about engineering soft skills and culture which you might enjoy.

  • Rod at work

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 33186

    I think a lot of this is influenced by the corporate environment or at least the department/section you're in. For example, at my previous job I worked on a small IT team writing software and saving the data for users who were all in the helping professions. Since it was a small IT team, we wore several hats, including business analyst, help desk, etc. Everyone on the IT team built good rapport with the users - we would listen to them, sometimes for quite a while, before saying anything. We just got good at it, out of necessity.

    In my current job I work in a large IT team. The culture here is everyone does what their job title suggests. Basically, you don't do anything else. Of course, this isn't a hard and fast rule, more of a general guideline. So, although I think of myself as having good soft skills, for the most part I have to wait for someone else to interface with the users and then distill that information to me. I miss not interacting with users more. Bottom line, I'm sure where I work is like a lot of other places that people here can relate to.

    Kindest Regards, Rod Connect with me on LinkedIn.

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 717406

    Toby Harman - Wednesday, March 13, 2019 10:28 PM

    Our CTO wrote an article on Forbes about engineering soft skills and culture which you might enjoy.

    Thanks, and I agree. Software developers need better soft skills.

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 995608

    What your great article ultimately describes (IMHO) is a properly implemented DevOps culture, which has been mistaken by most and demoted to mean a set of tools.  I take that back... there are two tools that will absolutely prevent a DevOps culture from happening and those tools are "Respect" (the subject of your article) and effective communication.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
    "If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."--Red Adair
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not."

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • allinadazework

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4365

    I don't think you have to respect people in order to do a good job for them, or with them for that matter. Some people are virtually impossible to respect - that's for sure! I think you shouldn't disrespect someone because they don't have the same skills that you have. You should certainly have the humility to acknowledge that you don't always know best and that you will do a better job if you take more time to understand the requirements. That seems to come from the having the desire and patience to understand someone who almost certainly isn't as coldly logical as you are as a programmer!
    And on a positive note for disrespect, you should definitely have a healthy disrespect for those who show no respect to others. You shouldn't be tolerant of intolerance.

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