SQL Server to Oracle

  • (Apologies if this has been asked before- I did have a look around, and I couldn't see anything.)

    I'm a SQL Server DBA in a new job in which I'm supposed to (I quote) "learn Oracle" as well. At my interviews I was told that there would be proper training for me, but... surprise, surprise, that's not true, so I'm expected to pick it up somehow.

    I've Googled the obvious stuff like "Oracle for the SQL Server DBA" and I've found a few things, including some articles on Brent Ozar's site, etc. Those are good, but they're not fundamental enough for me.

    Those of you who have made the transition yourself, what's the best place to start? I need to know the basics, but I also need to know what's the same and what's radically different compared to SQL Server. Any ideas?

    Thanks very much.

    (I've looked at paying for myself to go on a training course, but they're about £2,700 ($4,200), and I really don't want to spend that just because an employer won't invest in me.)

  • I can't remember on basic admin stuff, but this can help you for differences between SQL implementations of Oracle and SQL Server:

    http://troels.arvin.dk/db/rdbms/

    Of course, the same advise as the ones coming to any new system. RTM 😀 http://docs.oracle.com/en/database/database.html

    Luis C.
    General Disclaimer:
    Are you seriously taking the advice and code from someone from the internet without testing it? Do you at least understand it? Or can it easily kill your server?

    How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help: Option 1 / Option 2
  • Thanks very much, both. I will take a look at those links.

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  • I would start by learning RMAN as backup and restore is fundamental to the job of a DBA.

    SQLDeveloper, being java based, is relatively easy to install on a Windows machine. It will allow you the play around with the SQL syntax differences.

  • Our applicaton should run on SQL Server and Oracle backend (but one client uses only one backend at a time).

    The physical database models are generated by a 3rd party tool, we tried to avoid the database dependent things: we don't use triggers, sp's, based on the"Mapping a Simple field" documentation we tried to find the similar data types (e.g.: DateTime in SQL and Date in Oracle, bigint in SQL and number(19,0) in Oracle etc.). Both databases contain the same table and column names, PK's, FK's etc.

    Our domain model is reverse engineered from the SQL Server database.

    The MetaDataContainer is loaded with the metadataSource = AttributesMetadataSource.FromAssembly(...) and metadataContainer = metadataSource.GetModel() methods.

    When I try to run the application on Oracle, it throws an exception:

    The metadata for field '<column>' of class '<class>' cannot be initialized: Type converter initialization failed. The converter with name 'OracleUdt2StringConverter' does not convert from CLR type 'System.Int64' to SQL type 'bigint'

    The reason is obvious: in the Oracle database the integers are stored in number column types, not in bigint.

    Based on the previsous forum threads, I think, a solution can be: reverse engineering the Oracle database into a differenct project (into a different namespace maybe?, same or different .rlinq name?), and in the code I have to load this metadatasource/metadatacontainer in the case of Oracle backend?

    For me it is enough, if somebody could say a simple 'Yes', if this is the best solution in our case, but I'm open to read any better suggestion! VMware Training in Chennai | VMware Training in Chennai

  • This may sound weird but if you go through the SQL Server for the Oracle DBA class by Microsoft, you'll actually be able to learn quite a lot, including some foundational concepts (e.g. block vs page, user != user, etc...).

    See https://mva.microsoft.com/en-us/training-courses/sql-server-2014-essentials-for-oracle-dbas-9062?l=VGDAvmR4_7004984382

  • sqlm0j0e (1/19/2016)


    This may sound weird but if you go through the SQL Server for the Oracle DBA class by Microsoft, you'll actually be able to learn quite a lot, including some foundational concepts (e.g. block vs page, user != user, etc...).

    See https://mva.microsoft.com/en-us/training-courses/sql-server-2014-essentials-for-oracle-dbas-9062?l=VGDAvmR4_7004984382

    Agreed. I went through this myself too.

    Br. Kenneth Igiri
    https://kennethigiri.com
    All nations come to my light, all kings to the brightness of my rising

  • Why Migrating? Many reasons if you ask me starting with prize. SQL Server is expensive, but Oracle is way more expensive. It makes me a bit angry every single I time I see they(Oracle) charge you for every additional component(feature). That put aside, SQL Server also wins big time with the tight integration that it supports with all other Microsoft products - Windows Server, SharePoint, Exchange, System Centre, etc. Just these two above are a serious reason why your company should start at least thinking about migrating to SQL Server (not to mention that our community is the best out there!)

    - Discussion in Oracle Senior DBA Group: http://linkd.in/sKx5Uw

    - Discussion in Database Developers and Architects Group: http://linkd.in/tlGTqX

    I hope this helps.

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  • The Oracle DBA Tutorial playlist on youtube was the most helpful video series I viewed. https://www.youtube.com/user/roughsealtd/playlists

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