SQL Is Always Going to be Popular

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 717951

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item SQL Is Always Going to be Popular

  • Eric M Russell

    SSC Guru

    Points: 125074

    Yes, it seems that the SQL haters and relational purists have both lost the fight to the broader IT user base who prefer their database to be something more in the center.

    "Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Instead, seek what they sought." - Matsuo Basho

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 996046

    Heh... I'm often told that SQL Server isn't the center of the Universe.  My standard reply is "Cool!  Let's turn it off and see if you're right!". 😀

    Oddly enough, they never take me up on that.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
    "If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."--Red Adair
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not."

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • Eirikur Eiriksson

    SSC Guru

    Points: 182425

    Steve Jones - SSC Editor wrote:

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item SQL Is Always Going to be Popular

    Reminds me of your April's Fools' day Linux post a few years back ;D

    😎

     

  • This was removed by the editor as SPAM

  • skeleton567

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5024

    "It's daunting to consider spending 100 hours across the next year on some technology, only to find it's not likely to help you get the job you want."

    That may be, but is it not more daunting to think how you may regret not having invested the time?

    If I got it right, that's a tad less than .05 of the standard work year of 2080 hours.  Of course, IT folks probably average well over that 'standard'.

    You all may recall that a number of times I've advocated for finding an evening class at a community college to provide a structure to looking into something you're interested in.  I did that several times, and had both kinds of results, either finding  that I really was or really wasn't all that interested.  It also helped to see what other hardware and OS/DB vendors were doing, just in case I wanted to switch.  Especially now that you can download and install trial versions, get yourself a digital book and the software and go for it.  Either way, that 100 hours maybe be well spent.

     

     

    Rick

    The only thing worse than being an influencer
    is believing one.

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 996046

    I don't know... if you consider that 100 hours is probably outside of your normal work hours and you spend 2 hours of the 100 every day on weekdays, that would take 10 weeks (2.5 or so months).  That's a shedload of time to be messing around with something that either isn't going to work or that you're going to hate even if it does work.

    And that doesn't include travel time.

    I'd rather spend the time on something that I already know works very well and that I really like.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
    "If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."--Red Adair
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not."

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • skeleton567

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5024

    Jeff Moden wrote:

    I don't know... if you consider that 100 hours is probably outside of your normal work hours and you spend 2 hours of the 100 every day on weekdays, that would take 10 weeks (2.5 or so months).  That's a shedload of time to be messing around with something that either isn't going to work or that you're going to hate even if it does work.

    And that doesn't include travel time.

    I'd rather spend the time on something that I already know works very well and that I really like.

    Well, I think life is pretty much like that.  If you just hold bonds, you usually get some regular interest (salary, benefits, vacation) and you sort of hold your own considering inflation.  But to really get ahead, sometimes you need to reevaluate your holdings and try for better performance with some new stocks.  There will be good times and bad.  It doesn't always work, but at least you tried, and next year may be better.  That's what is called a 'diversified portfolio'.   The real growth comes from diversification.

    I remember years ago I had savings that were paying a whole five percent.  Pretty safe and solid.  But on the side I would buy 100 shares of Lotus Development Corp when things were quiet ( "time outside normal work hours").  Couple weeks later, it would be up two or three bucks, and I would sell, wait for things to drop, and buy in again.  It was pretty regular and I had several years when I more than doubled the investment each year.

    When I got out of school, I had a degree and got a job in my non-technical field.  And things were OK.  But then I  discovered computers and software, and decided to make the jump into something I knew nothing about - we didn't even have courses in IT at most colleges in those days.  First, just for trying something new I won a 40% salary increase.   This was good.  So I set a goal of increasing my skills and doubling my salary in three years.  This goal was accomplished in three years and three months.  Sure, along the way there have been things I liked and things I didn't like.

    Current skills are like bonds - usually steady and somewhat predictable.  New skills are the stocks.  Some perform and some don't. But you can't sell what you don't own.

    Rick

    The only thing worse than being an influencer
    is believing one.

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 996046

    Oh... no question about trying something new being a good thing.  That's actually how I got so involved with electronics, computers, and ultimately SQL Server (and many other programs including those in MS Office, etc, all of which have seriously helped my pay scale).  Although it was thrust upon me (accidental DBA), I spent (and still spend) a shedload of time teaching it to myself and studying what others were doing.

    I've just found that a lot of the new shiny stuff is really the same old stuff but with less functionality and frequently has a relatively very short life span.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
    "If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."--Red Adair
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not."

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

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