Some tips for working with big data models

  • Comments posted to this topic are about the item Some tips for working with big data models

  • How do you mix a star schema with a snowflake schema?

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • Thank you, that is a nice overview to reference when coming up against a daunting task like this. I did want to throw one tool into the mix that has been a great addition to my arsenal. The Case/ERD tool Toad Data Modeler handles the nicest mix of features without breaking the bank. It was originally named Case Studio and then purchased by Quest, albeit with a price increase to boot. It now costs about $479 (~$450 at Programmers Paradise), but far less expensive than most other tools with similar capabilities like ER/Win. Data Modeler handles the majority of tasks in your article, while also providing other nice features like column, table and object notes and comments that can be printed as part of your data dictionary, which also show when hovering over the object diagram.

    Also, I like the idea about colored rectangles to group related tables. Using Data Modeler, I color the tables by group and group them visually in a similar area, as much as possible, while also providing a legend in each area to denote what each color represents.

    Once again, thank you for you contribution,

    Tom

  • Excellent summary and I agree with it all.

    You should do articles on each individual point with examples.

    Thanks,

    Thomas LeBlanc

    TheSmilingDBA

    Thomas LeBlanc, MVP Data Platform Consultant

  • ERStudio from Embarcadero is your friend when you have complex data models!

    Best,
    Kevin G. Boles
    SQL Server Consultant
    SQL MVP 2007-2012
    TheSQLGuru on googles mail service

  • Thank you, these are good tips.

    Jason...AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
    _______________________________________________
    I have given a name to my pain...MCM SQL Server, MVP
    SQL RNNR
    Posting Performance Based Questions - Gail Shaw[/url]
    Learn Extended Events

  • Just curious, who came up with article first?

    http://eralokpandey.wordpress.com/2011/03/

  • I agree with theSQLGuru - ERStudio can be very helpful in larger models. I am curious why you focus on the big table(s) and the one(s) that are most frequently used. I could see this as being important for space and archiving concerns, but for business logic I would walk the foreign keys and study the procedures. It would be interesting to hear from you in a future article about what kinds of problems your methodology has solved.

  • Hello,

    I can assure you that my article came first, since I did a lot of research before posting it here and found nothing similar. You can check that by the data of the post, since to publish articles here in SQLServercentral.com you have to wait the approval of the administration. It's very sad that nowadays you can see a complete copy of your work without authorization and even a simple reference.

    Mauro Pichiliani

  • Zielyn (3/3/2011)


    Just curious, who came up with article first?

    http://eralokpandey.wordpress.com/2011/03/

    Well, I can tell you Mauro showed me his article in January/2011 if that helps you find an answer 🙂

    BTW, nice article, Mauro!

  • ya, I was kinda aware that this article was the original. Just pokin fun at someone that basically did a copy past job.

    Google search is a hell of a thing sometimes 😀

    Oh btw, Does anybody know a good database modeling software? I don't know of any off hand besides manual visio or something to that affect. I want to map my databases, but they change every day... and something somewhat automatic and low maintenance would be awesome.

  • MauroPichiliani (3/3/2011)


    It's very sad that nowadays you can see a complete copy of your work without authorization and even a simple reference.

    You shouldn't put up with this. Contact the guy, explain him that he has committed a copyright infringement and that he should put the article down. If he doesn't, contact Steve, the editor of this site. They have experience with this sort of issues...

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • Men, I didn't know how common those "reprints" were!!

    I checked Google and found 3 of my articles shown in some "serious" blogs out there. And 1 one of them has the nerve to write :

    "To read more: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/......"

    The only extra information people can find in SQLServerCentral's link is my name 😀

  • wagner crivelini (3/4/2011)


    Men, I didn't know how common those "reprints" were!!

    I checked Google and found 3 of my articles shown in some "serious" blogs out there. And 1 one of them has the nerve to write :

    "To read more: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/......"

    The only extra information people can find in SQLServerCentral's link is my name 😀

    The reference to sqlservercentral is so that they can say they were just "quoting" you.

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

  • Koen Verbeeck (3/4/2011)


    wagner crivelini (3/4/2011)


    Men, I didn't know how common those "reprints" were!!

    I checked Google and found 3 of my articles shown in some "serious" blogs out there. And 1 one of them has the nerve to write :

    "To read more: http://www.sqlservercentral.com/......"

    The only extra information people can find in SQLServerCentral's link is my name 😀

    The reference to sqlservercentral is so that they can say they were just "quoting" you.

    It's still copyright infringement (if they attributed Wagner) or outright plagiarism (if they didn't attribute Wagner). The only way it's not CI is if they asked Wagner's permission first or if he blatantly gave permission to anyone to use it.

    I couldn't help myself. I posted a comment on Alok's blog:

    Wow. This article is an exact duplicate (except for the first line) of an article posted yesterday on SQLServerCentral.com, by a different author. And since the SSC author had to wait a few weeks to get his article approved, it leads one to the conclusion that this blog post is possibly plagiarized.

    Care to explain?

    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/model/72275/

    Brandie Tarvin, MCITP Database AdministratorLiveJournal Blog: http://brandietarvin.livejournal.com/[/url]On LinkedIn!, Google+, and Twitter.Freelance Writer: ShadowrunLatchkeys: Nevermore, Latchkeys: The Bootleg War, and Latchkeys: Roscoes in the Night are now available on Nook and Kindle.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Login to reply