Passing a table value to a stored procedure

  • Is it possible in SSRS r2 to pass a table parameter to a stored procedure having a UDDT in it's parameter list?

    can SSRS r2 calling a procedure like this?:

    CREATE PROCEDURE Schema.StoredProcedureAcceptingAUDDTCollection

    @collection Schema.TableValueName READONLY

    AS

    I've search and I'm confuse with the multiple value option which seems to populate list from a DDL and turns it into a string which the server then parse (the 2005 way of doing it)

    CREATE PROCEDURE Schema.StoredProcedureAcceptingAStringToParse

    @DelimitedStringCollectionToParse NVARCHAR(MAX)

    AS

    ty

  • Megistal (12/9/2010)


    Is it possible in SSRS r2 to pass a table parameter to a stored procedure having a UDDT in it's parameter list?

    can SSRS r2 calling a procedure like this?:

    CREATE PROCEDURE Schema.StoredProcedureAcceptingAUDDTCollection

    @collection Schema.TableValueName READONLY

    AS

    you can use a table variable as a parameter for a stored procedure with SQL 2008, but it requires some planning, since it's not just any old table variable, but only one that has been

    created as a User Defined Table Type

    once you have that set up, you can use that table type as a parameter for your procedure.

    take a look at this article to help you get started on it, if that's what you are trying to do:

    http://www.sqlteam.com/article/sql-server-2008-table-valued-parameters

    I've search and I'm confuse with the multiple value option which seems to populate list from a DDL and turns it into a string which the server then parse (the 2005 way of doing it)

    CREATE PROCEDURE Schema.StoredProcedureAcceptingAStringToParse

    @DelimitedStringCollectionToParse NVARCHAR(MAX)

    AS

    ty

    Seperate from the above, a common solution is just as you describe; use a function that parses a string into a table; then use/join to the table to accomplish the task at hand.

    pasted below is what is currently acknowledged as the best split function to date, complete with the comments to help explain it:

    If you can give us more specific details on what you are trying to do, we can offer better advice; be sure to include some specific code so we know what you are trying to accomplish!

    CREATE FUNCTION dbo.DelimitedSplit8K

    /***************************************************************************************************

    Purpose:

    Split a given string at a given delimiter and return a list of the split elements (items).

    Returns:

    iTVF containing the following:

    ItemNumber = Element position of Item as a BIGINT (not converted to INT to eliminate a CAST)

    Item = Element value as a VARCHAR(8000)

    CROSS APPLY Usage Example:

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --===== Conditionally drop the test tables to make reruns easier for testing.

    -- (this is NOT a part of the solution)

    IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#JBMTest') IS NOT NULL

    DROP TABLE #JBMTest

    ;

    --===== Create and populate a test table on the fly (this is NOT a part of the solution).

    SELECT *

    INTO #JBMTest

    FROM (

    SELECT 1,'1,10,100,1000,10000,100000,1000000' UNION ALL

    SELECT 2,'2000000,200000,20000,2000,200,20,2' UNION ALL

    SELECT 3, 'This,is,a,test' UNION ALL

    SELECT 4, 'and so is this' UNION ALL

    SELECT 5, 'This, too (no pun intended)'

    ) d (SomeID,SomeValue)

    ;

    GO

    --===== Split the CSV column for the whole table using CROSS APPLY (this is the solution)

    SELECT test.SomeID, split.ItemNumber, split.Item

    FROM #JBMTest test

    CROSS APPLY

    (

    SELECT ItemNumber, Item

    FROM dbo.DelimitedSplit8k(test.SomeValue,',')

    ) split

    ;

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Notes:

    1. Optimized for VARCHAR(7999) or less. No testing or error reporting for truncation at 7999

    characters is done.

    2. Optimized for single character delimiter. Multi-character delimiters should be resolved

    externally from this function.

    3. Optimized for use with CROSS APPLY.

    4. Does not "trim" elements just in case leading or trailing blanks are intended.

    5. If you don't know how a Tally table can be used to replace loops, please see the following...

    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/T-SQL/62867/

    6. Changing this function to use VARCHAR(MAX) will cause it to run twice as slow. It's just the

    nature of VARCHAR(MAX) whether it fits in-row or not.

    7. Multi-machine testing for the method of using UNPIVOT instead of 10 SELECT/UNION ALLs shows

    that the UNPIVOT method is quite machine dependent and can slow things down quite a bit.

    8. Performance testing shows using "TOP" for the limiting criteria of "N" is actually

    slower and slightly more CPU intensive than the traditional WHERE N < LEN(@pString) + 2.

    9. Performance testing shows using ORDER BY (SELECT x) where "x" is anything is actually

    slower and slightly more CPU intensive than the traditional ORDER BY (SELECT N).

    Credits:

    This code is the product of many people's efforts including but not limited to the following:

    cteTally concept originally by Iztek Ben Gan and "decimalized" by Lynn Pettis (and others) for a

    bit of extra speed and finally redacted by Jeff Moden for a different slant on readability and

    compactness. Hat's off to Paul White for his simple explanations of CROSS APPLY. Finally,

    special thanks to Erland Sommarskog for his tireless efforts to help people understand

    what you can actually do with T-SQL. I also thank whoever wrote the first article I ever saw

    on "numbers tables" which is located at the following URL ...

    http://sqlserver2000.databases.aspfaq.com/why-should-i-consider-using-an-auxiliary-numbers-table.html

    Revision History:

    Rev 00 - 20 Jan 2010 - Concept: Lynn Pettis and others.

    Redaction/Implementation: Jeff Moden

    - Base 10 redaction and reduction for CTE. (Total rewrite)

    Rev 01 - 13 Mar 2010 - Jeff Moden

    - Removed one additional concatenation and one subtraction from the SUBSTRING in the

    SELECT List for that tiny bit of extra speed.

    Rev 02 - 14 Apr 2010 - Jeff Moden

    - No code changes. Added CROSS APPLY usage example to the header, some additional credits,

    and extra documentation.

    Rev 03 - 18 Apr 2010 - Jeff Moden

    - No code changes. Added notes 7, 8, and 9 about certain "optimizations" that dont'

    actually work for this type of function.

    Rev 04 - 29 Jun 2010 - Jeff Moden

    - Added WITH SCHEMABINDING thanks to a note by Paul White. This prevents an unnecessary

    "Table Spool" when the function is used in an UPDATE statement even though the function

    makes no external references.

    ***************************************************************************************************/

    --===== Define I/O parameters

    (

    @pString VARCHAR(7999),

    @pDelimiter CHAR(1)

    )

    RETURNS TABLE

    WITH SCHEMABINDING

    AS

    RETURN

    --===== "Inline" CTE Driven "Tally Table” produces values up to

    -- 10,000... enough to cover VARCHAR(8000)

    WITH

    E1(N) AS ( --=== Create Ten 1's

    SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL

    SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL

    SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL

    SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL

    SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 1 --10

    ),

    E2(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E1 a, E1 b), --100

    E4(N) AS (SELECT 1 FROM E2 a, E2 b), --10,000

    cteTally(N) AS (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY (SELECT N)) FROM E4)

    --===== Do the split

    SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY N) AS ItemNumber,

    SUBSTRING(@pString, N, CHARINDEX(@pDelimiter, @pString + @pDelimiter, N) - N) AS Item

    FROM cteTally

    WHERE N < LEN(@pString) + 2

    AND SUBSTRING(@pDelimiter + @pString, N, 1) = @pDelimiter

    ;

    GO

    Lowell


    --help us help you! If you post a question, make sure you include a CREATE TABLE... statement and INSERT INTO... statement into that table to give the volunteers here representative data. with your description of the problem, we can provide a tested, verifiable solution to your question! asking the question the right way gets you a tested answer the fastest way possible!

  • Thank you for your reply,

    I've read the article but so far there's no mention SSRS supporting this functionality.

    What I'm unaware of is does SSRS support also UDDT?

    Do we need to do custom .Net code inside SSRS for using UDDT? (Does even SSRS support custom made .Net DLL?)

    What I need to know is: I'm having a list of ID (x,y,z, a, b) containing one to several IDs from a possible long list.

    I wish to send that list from SSRS to a stored procedure for getting the data back on those ID only.

    In 2005, it would require a string parameter which is parsed on the server side.

    In 2008 there's a new feature which used UDDT to provide such functionality but I can't find any information if SSRS can used that UDDT-feature when calling SQL (.Net does, SQL does, is it possible for SSRS?).

    In a SQL & .Net world I've used it but when calling from SSRS I don't know what option and / or where to look for this. Hence the question, does SSRS support UDDT when calling a stored procedure? I wish to avoid string parsing on the server side if possible.

    I hope I've removed previous question ambiguity?

    ty

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