New SQL Saturday presentation ideas?

  • Ray K

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 31070

    So, I'm thinking that I need to come up with a new SQL Saturday presentation, but I'm finding myself clamoring for ideas.

    All my presentations up to this point have been professional development topics.  My primary forte is in documentation and communication, so that's where my focus is.  I'm not a SQL expert or MVP, so I won't be doing any topics on performance tuning or Power BI anytime soon.  As I describe myself, I "know enough SQL to be dangerous."

    This is not to say I can't present about SQL or data topics.  I've been tossing around an idea of a beginner's SQL presentation for some time -- only lack of time has kept me from developing it further.  I might still do something with it, but I need to take the time to sit down and hammer it out.

    Other than that, some other ideas I'm thinking about include:

    • A beginner's guide to normalization using Excel
    • Why design matters: making information presentable
    • Business networking online
    • Getting started with blogging
    In case you're wondering -- or even care -- here's a list of my SQL Saturday presentations (so far).

    So, I figured I'd open the question to you fine folks on SSC -- are any of these topics viable?  Or is there anything else that I could present that I haven't mentioned yet?

    +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    Check out my blog at https://pianorayk.wordpress.com/

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 994667

    How about one on strategic and tactical persuasion?  Like how to persuade Ray K to learn more about T-SQL and SQL Server so he has more subject matter to choose from. :D:D:D

    If you want to stick to the non-technical avenue, something on how to deal with bullies at work, how to make yourself heard without becoming a bully yourself (especially at meetings where some people think they're not doing the job unless they're talking and meetings where someone is hell bent to do something stupid in a project and will raise their voice to overtalk you if you do have something to say), and how to survive meetings where people won't let you get a word in edgewise and still be able to get the job done.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
    "If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."--Red Adair
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not."
    When you put the right degree of spin on it, the number 3|8 is also a glyph that describes the nature of a DBAs job. 😉

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • Ray K

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 31070

    Jeff Moden - Thursday, January 10, 2019 9:38 AM

    How about one on strategic and tactical persuasion?  Like how to persuade Ray K to learn more about T-SQL and SQL Server so he has more subject matter to choose from. :D:D:D

    If you want to stick to the non-technical avenue, something on how to deal with bullies at work, how to make yourself heard without becoming a bully yourself (especially at meetings where some people think they're not doing the job unless they're talking and meetings where someone is hell bent to do something stupid in a project and will raise their voice to overtalk you if you do have something to say), and how to survive meetings where people won't let you get a word in edgewise and still be able to get the job done.

    LOL!  Somehow, I knew I could count on you for a response, Jeff! 😀

    The workplace bullying one is interesting -- that one hadn't occurred to me.  I'll definitely think about that.  Ironically, I know of a recent incident directly related to this (thankfully, not in my workplace) that prompted me to write an article about toxic work environments.

    +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    Check out my blog at https://pianorayk.wordpress.com/

  • Grant Fritchey

    SSC Guru

    Points: 395510

    It doesn't matter that you're not an MVP or whatever. You can teach beginners sessions in tech. Do one on backups. WAY too many people are still getting that wrong. It's a great topic for blog posts, presentations, pretty much anything. You can pick any other beginning topic too. Best of all, with only a few exceptions, many of the lord high mucky muck MVPs won't do introductory sessions because they're so far beneath them. That makes the field more open there.

    ----------------------------------------------------
    The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood...
    Theodore Roosevelt

    The Scary DBA
    Author of: SQL Server 2017 Query Performance Tuning, 5th Edition and SQL Server Execution Plans, 3rd Edition
    Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 994667

    Grant Fritchey - Friday, January 11, 2019 6:37 AM

    It doesn't matter that you're not an MVP or whatever. You can teach beginners sessions in tech. Do one on backups. WAY too many people are still getting that wrong. It's a great topic for blog posts, presentations, pretty much anything. You can pick any other beginning topic too. Best of all, with only a few exceptions, many of the lord high mucky muck MVPs won't do introductory sessions because they're so far beneath them. That makes the field more open there.

    Totally agreed.   On that very note, Ed Wagner has submitted his awesome "What's important" session for the Cleveland SQL Saturday.  It's a beginner session that covers a lot of which you speak.  I hope they pick it up as they did in Pittsburgh for the last 2 or 3 years.  The room is always full when he gives it.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
    "If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."--Red Adair
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not."
    When you put the right degree of spin on it, the number 3|8 is also a glyph that describes the nature of a DBAs job. 😉

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • Ed Wagner

    SSC Guru

    Points: 286958

    Jeff Moden - Friday, January 11, 2019 7:46 AM

    Grant Fritchey - Friday, January 11, 2019 6:37 AM

    It doesn't matter that you're not an MVP or whatever. You can teach beginners sessions in tech. Do one on backups. WAY too many people are still getting that wrong. It's a great topic for blog posts, presentations, pretty much anything. You can pick any other beginning topic too. Best of all, with only a few exceptions, many of the lord high mucky muck MVPs won't do introductory sessions because they're so far beneath them. That makes the field more open there.

    Totally agreed.   On that very note, Ed Wagner has submitted his awesome "What's important" session for the Cleveland SQL Saturday.  It's a beginner session that covers a lot of which you speak.  I hope they pick it up as they did in Pittsburgh for the last 2 or 3 years.  The room is always full when he gives it.

    Thanks for the mention, Jeff.  It's the least technical of any presentations I've given and people seems to like it.  I think the reason it's popular is because there are beginners out there who need instruction on the basics.  It fills a need, especially for the new or accidental DBA.

  • Ray K

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 31070

    Ed Wagner - Monday, January 14, 2019 5:27 AM

    Jeff Moden - Friday, January 11, 2019 7:46 AM

    Grant Fritchey - Friday, January 11, 2019 6:37 AM

    It doesn't matter that you're not an MVP or whatever. You can teach beginners sessions in tech. Do one on backups. WAY too many people are still getting that wrong. It's a great topic for blog posts, presentations, pretty much anything. You can pick any other beginning topic too. Best of all, with only a few exceptions, many of the lord high mucky muck MVPs won't do introductory sessions because they're so far beneath them. That makes the field more open there.

    Totally agreed.   On that very note, Ed Wagner has submitted his awesome "What's important" session for the Cleveland SQL Saturday.  It's a beginner session that covers a lot of which you speak.  I hope they pick it up as they did in Pittsburgh for the last 2 or 3 years.  The room is always full when he gives it.

    Thanks for the mention, Jeff.  It's the least technical of any presentations I've given and people seems to like it.  I think the reason it's popular is because there are beginners out there who need instruction on the basics.  It fills a need, especially for the new or accidental DBA.

    Ed, can you post a link to it?  (SQL Saturday abstract is fine!)  I'm interested in knowing more about it!

    +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    Check out my blog at https://pianorayk.wordpress.com/

  • Ray K

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 31070

    FWIW, I put together an abstract for a presentation on blogging.  Now I just need to put a presentation together.

    However, I love the discussion I've seen here so far!  These are definitely ideas that I want to use!  Keep 'em coming!

    +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    Check out my blog at https://pianorayk.wordpress.com/

  • latkinson

    Ten Centuries

    Points: 1177

    I like your idea of a session on starting a blog. I find myself wanting to start a blog, partly because I think here and there I have found a few nuggets worth writing up and sharing, but also, because I like the idea of sharing knowledge. I'm also intrigued by your mention of online networking. I'm lousy at networking, and even more so at staying in contact online. So , if you've got useful tips, like how to make the time to check in, etc. I'd be interested in hearing them.

    Thanks for posting your link with slides from previous sessions, there are several I intend to download and read.

    Luther

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic. Login to reply