Conversion of currency stored as varchar to decimal

  • Hi all,

    I am trying to convert currency values stored as a string to decimal. In my dataset, there is a currency column with values like $15,000.50 stored as varchar. I am trying to convert it to 15000.50

    I tried SELECT CONVERT (decimal , '$15,000.50 ') but end up with the dreaded conversion type error. In another scenario I tried to replace  "$" with a blank like so and it worked

    select CONVERT(decimal (10,2),replace('$50.50','$',''))

    This wouldn't work in my first example because of the $ and comma in the value. Is there a method to do this more efficiently ?

    Thanks

  • It's always lovely to have numbers, dates , datetime info stored in (N)varchar as it guarantees for problems in the future.

    Is there any chance you can just replace the '$' with a blank in the varchar kolom, without trying to convert to number?

    Johan

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  • I did it using a double replace. But wondering if there is a cleaner way to do it

    select TRY_CONVERT(decimal (10,2),REPLACE(REPLACE('$16,500.50','$',''),',','') )

  • assuming you are using US formats you can do

    select convert(decimal(10, 2), parse('$16,500.50' as money using 'en-US'))

  • frederico_fonseca wrote:

    assuming you are using US formats you can do

    select convert(decimal(10, 2), parse('$16,500.50' as money using 'en-US'))

    thanks this worked. I tweaked it by using try_parse as there are non-numeric values in my column

  • you can convert it money data type

    SELECT CONVERT (money , '$15,000.50 ')

  • SELECT CONVERT (decimal(9, 2) , CAST('$15,000.50' AS money))

    SQL DBA,SQL Server MVP(07, 08, 09) A socialist is someone who give you the shirt off *someone else's* back.

  • NO! the old Sybase MONEY datatypes have ugly rounding problems; google it! https://www.red-gate.com/hub/product-learning/sql-prompt/avoid-use-money-smallmoney-datatypes

    Please post DDL and follow ANSI/ISO standards when asking for help. 

  • Follow Brent O's rule; " Store data how it is used (NOT displayed) and use it how it is stored!'

    Please post DDL and follow ANSI/ISO standards when asking for help. 

  • Not really. A basic principle of a modern tiered architecture  is xto do diplay owrk in a presentation layer, in the database.

    Please post DDL and follow ANSI/ISO standards when asking for help. 

  • jcelko212 32090 wrote:

    NO! the old Sybase MONEY datatypes have ugly rounding problems; google it! https://www.red-gate.com/hub/product-learning/sql-prompt/avoid-use-money-smallmoney-datatypes%5B/quote%5D

    Agreed, but that's now how the MONEY datatype is being used in this instance.  Instead, it's being used to short circuit currency symbols and thousands separators in a VERY efficient fashion.  There's nothing wrong with its "interim usage", as several of the posters did on this thread.  Even an implicit conversion is ok on the way into a target table that correctly uses Numeric or Decimal.

    Also, if you read up on those two datatypes, you'll find they also have some rather nasty rounding problems in certain common cases especially when it comes to things like compound interest on decreasing principal balances.

    You've also responded to 3 posts above and we have no clue which posts you're addressing.  It makes even well-founded, correct answers fairly useless.

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