Connect QuickBooks to SQL Server through SSIS

  • Comments posted to this topic are about the item Connect QuickBooks to SQL Server through SSIS

  • nice informercial.

  • What VS and SQL Server versions does this require?

    Thanks,

  • It's a standard ADO.NET Data Source so you should be fine with 2005 or later

  • Thanks - I assume that to have that kind of "integration" project type in VS I need to have SSIS installed or configured or whatever? I've never looked at SSIS. Sounds like it could also be done (with more steps/code) just using QB as an Ado.Net data source?

  • Yes - you can use the RSSBus ADO.NET provider for QuickBooks as a standard ADO.NET Data Source with full CRUD support. If you use the Visual Studio designers there wouldn't even be any coding required. It's a standard ADO.NET source so you can easily bind to it from just about anything.

  • +1 on the infomercial reference. The article is nicely written, but what's the point of being misleading, the article implies that you can do it natively, not that you'll have to spend money. If you were going to spend money, you'd already know about this company and their product, and presumably would know how to implement it as well.

  • Jason, I'm not sure that I follow - the article is not in any way attempting to be misleading, nor does the fact that it is an article imply that the solution should be free. There are dozens of articles on the site that use commercial products to help solve data problems.

  • I never said attempting to be misleading, I said flat out misleading. The fact it is an article attempting to solve a solution to a community does imply the solution should be free, otherwise it should be labeled as an Ad. You're correct, dozens of articles do stump for commercial products, doesn't mean they are correct either. It's like googling for a solution to an issue and hitting experts-exchange and having to pay for an answer that is freely available in plenty of other forums.

    All that said, it was a very good explanation on how to use the product.

  • This was removed by the editor as SPAM

  • Very useful information for quickbooks support number.

  • jason.quackenbush - Wednesday, June 6, 2012 2:46 PM

    I never said attempting to be misleading, I said flat out misleading. The fact it is an article attempting to solve a solution to a community does imply the solution should be free, otherwise it should be labeled as an Ad. You're correct, dozens of articles do stump for commercial products, doesn't mean they are correct either. It's like googling for a solution to an issue and hitting experts-exchange and having to pay for an answer that is freely available in plenty of other forums.All that said, it was a very good explanation on how to use the product.

    I'll add one more complaint to that observation.  If you look at the article now, none of the graphics are visible.  This is because they didn't take the time to upload them to the article (as they should) and the links to the graphics are no longer available, although the company does still appear to be in business.

    Even if the article remained useful without the graphics, I'm not likely to go searching for the squirrel that buried the acorn.  Companies really should keep track of their own stuff on other forums if they actually do want some business from their infomercial instead of leaving aging piles of poo in someone's front yard. 😉

    Of course, Microsoft does the same thing with moving their links so fast and often that even current documentation has broken links.

    And, yeah... thumbs up on the "misleading" thing.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)
    Intro to Tally Tables and Functions

  • Using SQL Server as a backup for critical business data provides an essential safety net against loss. In addition, backing up data to SQL Server enables business users to more easily connect that data with features like reporting, full-text search, analytics, and more.

    This example demonstrates how to use the QuickBooks ADO.NET Data Provider inside of a SQL Server SSIS workflow to transfer data directly from desktop editions of QuickBooks into a Microsoft SQL Server database. The same procedure outlined below can be used with any CData ADO.NET Data Providers to connect SQL Server directly with remote data via SSIS.

    1. Open Visual Studio and create a new Integration Services Project.
    2. Add a new Data Flow Task from the Toolbox onto the Control Flow screen.
    3. Add an ADO.NET Source and an OLE DB Destination from the Toolbox.

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    4. Add a new ADO.Data Connection, and in the .NET Providers menu, select CData ADO.NET Provider for QuickBooks.
    5. In the connection manager, enter the connection details for your QuickBooks machine. This example uses a QuickBooks instance hosted on on the local machine.

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    6. Open the ADO.NET Source editor and set the following information:
    7. ADO.NET connection manager: In the Connection Managers menu, select the Data Connection you just created.

      Data access mode: Select 'SQL command'.

    8. SQL command text: Enter a SELECT command, such as the one below:

      SELECT * FROM Customers

    9. Close the ADO.NET Source editor and drag the arrow below the ADO.NET Source to connect it to the OLE DB Destination.

      Open the OLE DB Destination and enter the following information in the Destination Component Editor.

    10. Connection manager: Add a new connection. Select the SQL Server Native Client in the .NET Providers menu and enter your server and database information.
    11. Data access mode: Set your data access mode to "table or view" and select the table or view to populate in your database.

      Configure any properties you wish to on the Mappings screen.

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    12. Close the OLE DB Destination Editor and run the project. After the SSIS Task has finished executing, your database will be populated with data obtained from QuickBooks.

    This may help you,

    Technical Consultant- Apps4Rent

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