Buffer Manager

  • Comments posted to this topic are about the item Buffer Manager

    Thanks

  • Nice easy question .. and thank goodness one that will NOT provoke arguments and the begging for "I want my points"

    So thank you

    If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something.

    Ron

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  • Thank you for the question

    It says on msdn link:

    "You can query the bpool_commit_target and bpool_committed columns in the sys.dm_os_sys_info catalog view to return the number of pages reserved as the memory target and the number of pages currently committed in the buffer cache, respectively."

    Why would you someone need to query for such information?

    Thank you,

    Iulian

  • Iulian -207023 (7/19/2011)


    Thank you for the question

    It says on msdn link:

    "You can query the bpool_commit_target and bpool_committed columns in the sys.dm_os_sys_info catalog view to return the number of pages reserved as the memory target and the number of pages currently committed in the buffer cache, respectively."

    Why would you someone need to query for such information?

    Thank you,

    Iulian

    To maintain performance stats, maintain baseline information etc.

    M&M

  • Why is it called ramp-up though?

  • 😀 ... very true! This has been the case for 1 or 2 questions within the last 2 wks.

  • bitbucket-25253 (7/18/2011)


    Nice easy question .. and thank goodness one that will NOT provoke arguments and the begging for "I want my points"

    So thank you

    😀 ... very true! This has been the case for 1 or 2 questions within the last 2 wks.

  • paul s-306273 (7/19/2011)


    Why is it called ramp-up though?

    Good point, looking at wiki:

    Ramp up is a term used in economics and business to describe an increase in firm production ahead of anticipated increases in product demand. Alternatively, ramp up describes the period between product development, and maximum capacity utilization, characterized by product and process experimentation and improvements

    This looks to me pretty much the way buffer management works.

    Regards,

    Iulian

  • Good question thanks.

    http://brittcluff.blogspot.com/

  • Nice question, thanks.

  • Good call, managed to research it and find the answer but still worth knowing!

  • thanks for the question

    Jason...AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
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  • Iulian -207023 (7/19/2011)


    Thank you for the question

    It says on msdn link:

    "You can query the bpool_commit_target and bpool_committed columns in the sys.dm_os_sys_info catalog view to return the number of pages reserved as the memory target and the number of pages currently committed in the buffer cache, respectively."

    Why would you someone need to query for such information?

    Thank you,

    Iulian

    To tell if your system had finished starting up or as todays QOTD calls it finished "ramp-up".

    Never heard of the terminology "Ramp-Up" in reference to SQL server before today. Apparently it is so obscure that even MSDN does not show a single SQL server result when searching the text "Ramp-Up".

    I have documented the time to reach the bpool_commit_target before. Used this once to calculate and document the Full time needed for a cluster fail-over and recover to the a point of operation prior to the fail-over event. The idea was that once the Query Buffer or bpool_commit_target was reached the new node was working and responding to data requests.

  • Good clear question and answer, but I thought at first that a knowledge of English mades it almost impossible to get it wrong (if one assumes writers of BoL also know English) - so perhaps it was a bit too easy. Then I looked and saw 431% wrong so far - does this indicate that 41% of answerers didn't have good English, or that there is something I don't now about English that I ought to?

    Tom

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