A New Language

  • Comments posted to this topic are about the item A New Language

  • I think GO (GoLang) is a good one to learn.  It was designed to balance fast compile, fast execution and ease of use.

    It has its unit test capability built in and also profile and tracing.

    So far I have found what I have learned in Python to be useful for GO.

    I have considered Rust and Dart but I think for data engineering GO might be the better bet.

  • I enjoy working through the Advent of Code challenges, so I'm going to have to stop procrastinating this year and learn a lot more Python or GO.

  • C# . It's mostly used by our devs.  ( it helps translating ORM implementations ). Investing R / ML is on hold as you need quite a statistical background

  • For me, my next language to learn is Python. I've taken a beginner's course in Python, but still don't really know Python. Python is powerful and in high demand. It's just now I'm finding I need to improve some specialized aspects of C#, so I spend several hours each week practicing these.

    Rod

  • Python is my first choice of a new language to learn. And while I'm not sure Powershell is a language exactly, I need to know more about it. And JSON keeps popping up on my radar, especially when dealing with Azure, so I think my 2022 dance card is full with those three.

    Luther

     

  • I've been working on my Python skills as I want to move into a data engineering role.  However I think your point in this podcast was a good one.  We need to be growing our skills beyond the current language or toolsets we use.


    Russ

  • Not a language necessarily but it's definitely high time i learn how to really use git.  We're starting to really use it and i need to be able to troubleshoot and fix it properly and it's super cludgy with high potential for bad mistakes.

  • Not exactly what you were asking, but for me there is no question -- Spanish.

  • Continued Python then PowerShell and web technologies like HTML5/CSS/JS, nodejs etc. Then for technologies containers, cloud, git/github. I want to branch to postgresql and graph and document store dbs as well.

    • This reply was modified 7 months ago by  Jason-. Reason: brevity

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  • David.Poole wrote:

    I think GO (GoLang) is a good one to learn.  It was designed to balance fast compile, fast execution and ease of use.

    It has its unit test capability built in and also profile and tracing.

    So far I have found what I have learned in Python to be useful for GO.

    I have considered Rust and Dart but I think for data engineering GO might be the better bet.

    Golang has become popular in MS and at Redgate. I tried a few basic things, but should spend more time here.

  • DavidL wrote:

    Not exactly what you were asking, but for me there is no question -- Spanish.

     

    Bueno. Je etudie francais et japonais

  • I played with R a little bit but it's not for me. I find python much more interesting and easier to wrap my head around. I'll continue to work on that and learn more about PowerShell. I haven't written anything in C# for a while so I should do a project or two in that to keep my chops up. I saw a couple people mention GO and I might need to take a look at that as well. Non-language but I need to dive into Linux more. I might reformat my old laptop with Ubuntu to learn more about that and learn bash in the process.

  • Our DBA team has an ASP.NET application called DBADashboard where we consolidate various operational reports for our own consumption and other reports that provide visibility to other IT teams. It's based on MVP/Razor which is a blend of HTML / C# / JavaScript - three languages that are widely used.

    Aside from application development, several database platforms like Azure CosmosDB, MongoDB, and Snowflake use JavaScript for programming stored procedures, so from a DBA or database developer perspective, it's something good to be familiar with.

    "Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Instead, seek what they sought." - Matsuo Basho

  • Happy to hear, btw, that you are studying Japanese!  That was my undergrad degree way back in the day, and I ended up spending 11 years there.  From there it was on to Germany and German.

    The tools available for learning a language now would have been inconceivable 40 years ago, so you've at least got a leg up in that regard.

    Good luck!

     

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