70-762 Developing SQL Databases

  • Brendan Costigan

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 100

    I produced these notes a while back when I was looking to do the above exam. I've had some feedback on them that suggested they were helpful to people so felt I should share them a bit more widely.

    They are available at the following location: http://www.stillcoding.co.uk/asp/SQLServer/SQL2016_70-762.aspx

    Let me know if you feel I have got anything wrong.

  • Rodrigoherqdoq

    Valued Member

    Points: 55

    Hi, I also found another 70-762 exam notes, do they provide the same? anyone know it?
    https://www.testpassport.com/MCSA/70-762.asp

  • firman_gary

    Grasshopper

    Points: 17

    There are so many site online, my colleague passed his SQL Server certification last month, so he recommended resource from https://www.passcert.com/s_MCSA-SQL-2016-Database-Development.html

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 993863

    firman_gary - Friday, August 31, 2018 12:11 AM

    There are so many site online, my colleague passed his SQL Server certification last month, so he recommended resource from https://www.passcert.com/s_MCSA-SQL-2016-Database-Development.html

    That site contains wording that strongly supports the reason why I don't trust people with certifications.  And, I quote "Memorize whole questions and answers in Passcert".

    Memorization without a practical (or any, really) understanding... yeah... lemme hire someone like that. :sick:  No wonder so many people don't think much of the terms "DBA" and "Database Developer" anymore.  The terms have been cheapened a whole lot by people that game the system to get certified with no real knowledge (MCM excluded but they don't offer that cert anymore).  It's also a good part of the reason why a lot of people think RDBMSs suck... these gamers (and there are a shedload of them) don't actually know how to use one.

    The good part is that such idiots are fairly easy to weed out in an interview.  The bad part is that a lot of idiots are also conducting the interviews.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
    "If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."--Red Adair
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not."
    When you put the right degree of spin on it, the number 3|8 is also a glyph that describes the nature of a DBAs job. 😉

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems

  • Lynn Pettis

    SSC Guru

    Points: 442116

    Jeff Moden - Friday, August 31, 2018 6:54 AM

    firman_gary - Friday, August 31, 2018 12:11 AM

    There are so many site online, my colleague passed his SQL Server certification last month, so he recommended resource from https://www.passcert.com/s_MCSA-SQL-2016-Database-Development.html

    That site contains wording that strongly supports the reason why I don't trust people with certifications.  And, I quote "Memorize whole questions and answers in Passcert".

    Memorization without a practical (or any, really) understanding... yeah... lemme hire someone like that. :sick:  No wonder so many people don't think much of the terms "DBA" and "Database Developer" anymore.  The terms have been cheapened a whole lot by people that game the system to get certified with no real knowledge (MCM excluded but they don't offer that cert anymore).  It's also a good part of the reason why a lot of people think RDBMSs suck... these gamers (and there are a shedload of them) don't actually know how to use one.

    The good part is that such idiots are fairly easy to weed out in an interview.  The bad part is that a lot of idiots are also conducting the interviews.

    That was also the feelings about Microsofts MCSE certs years ago (and still today?) as people would attend a 16 day boot camp, take the tests and be certified with no real experience either.  I have been wanting to get MS Certs just to see how I would do, but just haven't made the time.

  • Lowell

    SSC Guru

    Points: 323349

    I've gone through the effort to get some certs,and i will not bore anyone with the alphabet soup.
    My feelings are mixed.

    I'm an experienced DBA.  For me,The lower layer SQL certs did not test my DBA experience.
    They tended to ask questions in a weird, roundabout way to obfuscate the focus of the question, or knowledge.
    They asked edge questions that really required either doing the labs, on the assumption that if you know the edge cases, you must know the meat and potatoes.
    They are obfuscated on purpose, so that it is more difficult/rare to get the cert, so it has some value, i guess.
    The higher level certs I actually felt tested better scenarios and knowledge. they went into  deeper use cases that touched on multiple knowledge points.

    At the end of it all, i held these two views:
    The certs are worth the cost of the electrons they are printed on.
    The certs show a person that goes above and beyond the everyday to make themselves better.

    Lowell


    --help us help you! If you post a question, make sure you include a CREATE TABLE... statement and INSERT INTO... statement into that table to give the volunteers here representative data. with your description of the problem, we can provide a tested, verifiable solution to your question! asking the question the right way gets you a tested answer the fastest way possible!

  • Jeff Moden

    SSC Guru

    Points: 993863

    Lowell - Friday, August 31, 2018 9:16 AM

    I've gone through the effort to get some certs,and i will not bore anyone with the alphabet soup.
    My feelings are mixed.

    I'm an experienced DBA.  For me,The lower layer SQL certs did not test my DBA experience.
    They tended to ask questions in a weird, roundabout way to obfuscate the focus of the question, or knowledge.
    They asked edge questions that really required either doing the labs, on the assumption that if you know the edge cases, you must know the meat and potatoes.
    They are obfuscated on purpose, so that it is more difficult/rare to get the cert, so it has some value, i guess.
    The higher level certs I actually felt tested better scenarios and knowledge. they went into  deeper use cases that touched on multiple knowledge points.

    At the end of it all, i held these two views:
    The certs are worth the cost of the electrons they are printed on.
    The certs show a person that goes above and beyond the everyday to make themselves better.

    Not everyone that goes for the certs is an idiot.  People like yourself have used it as a proper study guide to learn and understand rather than just go the proverbial "spelling-bee" route that a whole lot of people go through.  And I agree about the test questions (haven't taken a test... have just seen some of the questions that people have stupidly published).  It seems like the test writers are more concerned with trying to trick the test taker than to measure what the test taker actually knows.  To that end, it's no wonder so many people simply memorize stuff from the study materials and brain dumps.

    Even if you do it all absolutely right with proper learning and understanding, you won't find the likes of a Tally Table on any of the tests and you won't find anything on how to use a table as a row-source without using the content of the table itself (for example).  You also won't be warned about how bad the likes of FORMAT, XML, and rCTEs that increment a count will be nor how to work around those. 😀

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
    "If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur."--Red Adair
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not."
    When you put the right degree of spin on it, the number 3|8 is also a glyph that describes the nature of a DBAs job. 😉

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems

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