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What is SQL Server not good at?


What is SQL Server not good at?

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Dave Poole
Dave Poole
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Depends what you regard as SQL Server.
1. The relational engine
2. The column store engine
3. SS IS/AS/RS
4. Full-text search

For me full-text search is disappointing. That is why people suck data out into Apache SOLR.
Having used Ab Initio I can say that SSIS isn't brilliant.

The question I have is whether you think SS IS/RS should be open-sourced?

For what you get the costs aren't as bad as they are made out to be. Open source is great on the community editions but you quickly reach the point where what you actually need is the Enterprise Edition in which case the costs are comparable and you have to factor in the additional effort to integrate everything.

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will 58232
will 58232
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What is SQL Server not good at?

Defining constraints declaratively.

The CREATE ASSERTION statement has been in the SQL standard since 1992. Microsoft still haven't implemented it.

If you have a constraint that states "a department must not have more than its maximum number of employees" you currently have to write triggers on two different tables to achieve this.

With CREATE ASSERTION this constraint can be achieved with a single SQL expression.

As none of the other major SQL-DBMS vendors have implemented assertions, this would give Microsoft a major selling point.
HighPlainsDBA
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Absolutely. Over the last few years, it's one of the first questions I ask vendors about their products. To me it's similar to knowing when not to use my hammer for a given home improvement scenario. Salespeople will talk all day about how wonderful their product is, but if they can't tell me any of its weaknesses then I'm a little suspicious.
Tom Thomson
Tom Thomson
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There are a few failings that I find irritating:-
The inability to represent domain constraints directly. If I have some domain that is used in many coulumns and in many tables, I want to be able to declare that domain, name it, use the name in each of teh plances I want that domain. But I have to use a check constraint to define the domain instead, which means writing a constraint once for each place I use that domain.
The inability to handle general regular expressions, instead of the silly wildcard stuff for strings - and that compounts the domain issue.
All sorts of other things, but as it's an SQL based system I can't really ask for it to support the relational model, can I (eg why isn't there a symmetric difference operator).
Where is support for the latest floating point standard?
Where is support for the error management capabilities of the old floating point tandard that it claims to support?

I could probably go on,and make a longer list, but it wouldn't be useful.

On community comments, I think MS will happily publish them if they point out real issues; they don't seem to do much vetting of community comments, or pay much attention to them. I guess they might take notice and suppress something if it were illegal or thoroughly immoral or just an anti-microsoft rant rather than anything useful. But I've seen some quite idiotic comments that were allowed to stand, and also some quite anti-microsoft ones that raised real issues but in a pretty offensive manner, which suggests they are not excessively sensitive about what we add to their BOL pages.

As a general

Tom

Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
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ccd3000 (11/22/2013)
Absolutely. Over the last few years, it's one of the first questions I ask vendors about their products. To me it's similar to knowing when not to use my hammer for a given home improvement scenario. Salespeople will talk all day about how wonderful their product is, but if they can't tell me any of its weaknesses then I'm a little suspicious.


Oddly enough, I feel the same way about the T-SQL "hammer" that I use all day every day.

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. -- Red Adair

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will 58232
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@L' Eomot Inversé

support the relational model


Yes, that is something that SQL Server doesn't do well.

However the competitors are no better on this front.
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