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convert data type


convert data type

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sqlfriends
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I would like to convert a column from varchar(10) to int.
I also want to ignore any values that have charaters in it.

I searched online and used this:

select RecordId, [name]
,Cast(BuildingCode as int) as BuildingCode
where BuildingCode Not LIKE '%[^0-9.-]%'

but I don't actually know what does this Not LIKE '%[^0-9.-]%' mean?

What ^ represent for?

Thanks
Koen Verbeeck
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^ is the negation. So %[^0-9.-]% means "every character that is not 0 through 9, a dot or the minus symbol".

LIKE (Transact-SQL)


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WolfgangE
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Here is a nice article which shows you why one would use this expression:
http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/IsNumeric/71512/
subbu1
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pls check below code:
declare @t1 table(id int,name varchar(10))
insert into @t1(id,name) values(1,'1'),(2,'2'),(3,'4'),(4,'7'),(5,'8_'),(9,'9'),(10,'0')
select id,CONVERT(int,replace(name,'_','')) from @t1
--CONVERT(int,replace(name,'_','')) from @t1
where name like '%[^0_9]%'
here name will come between 0 and 9 (zero,nine related records will not come)
sqlfriends
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Koen Verbeeck (11/28/2012)
^ is the negation. So %[^0-9.-]% means "every character that is not 0 through 9, a dot or the minus symbol".

LIKE (Transact-SQL)


Thanks, and thanks for site link, it makes more sense to me now.

If this is the case, I think I don't need to include . and - sign.
Because my building code always is a number, no negative, no decimals.

So shall I just use

not like %[^0-9]%
Koen Verbeeck
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sqlfriends (11/28/2012)
Koen Verbeeck (11/28/2012)
^ is the negation. So %[^0-9.-]% means "every character that is not 0 through 9, a dot or the minus symbol".

LIKE (Transact-SQL)


Thanks, and thanks for site link, it makes more sense to me now.

If this is the case, I think I don't need to include . and - sign.
Because my building code always is a number, no negative, no decimals.

So shall I just use

not like %[^0-9]%


This is actually a double negation, so the following should work as well:

LIKE '%[0-9]%'

Be aware that using the % symbol at the start of a LIKE clause won't have good performance, as an index can't be used.


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Thanks, that makes sense.
But I wonder why some people use : not like %[^0-9]%


For my case, can I just change it to
Like '[0-9]%'.

What is the difference between like '%[0-9]%'

and like '[0-9]%'.
Koen Verbeeck
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There's no logical difference between NOT LIKE '%[^0-9]%' and LIKE '%[0-9]%'. Because the first one is a double negation, it will be the same when you leave all the negations out.


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Thanks,
how about the difference
between

like '%[0-9]%'

and like '[0-9]%'.
Sean Lange
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sqlfriends (11/28/2012)
Thanks,
how about the difference
between

like '%[0-9]%'

and like '[0-9]%'.


Are you familiar with with using wildcard searches? The first one will find any row that contains a 0-9 anywhere in the value. The second one will find any row that starts with 0-9.

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