SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Difference between MySQL and Oracle? What's better?


Difference between MySQL and Oracle? What's better?

Author
Message
Cathydoesloans
Cathydoesloans
SSC Journeyman
SSC Journeyman (79 reputation)SSC Journeyman (79 reputation)SSC Journeyman (79 reputation)SSC Journeyman (79 reputation)SSC Journeyman (79 reputation)SSC Journeyman (79 reputation)SSC Journeyman (79 reputation)SSC Journeyman (79 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 79 Visits: 6
Hello all!
I wanna studying Oracle after a long time working with MySQl..
Is really really difficult to work with Oracle?
Does oracle have a lot of difference with Mysql?
thank for watching!
Eric M Russell
Eric M Russell
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (75K reputation)SSC Guru (75K reputation)SSC Guru (75K reputation)SSC Guru (75K reputation)SSC Guru (75K reputation)SSC Guru (75K reputation)SSC Guru (75K reputation)SSC Guru (75K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 75368 Visits: 13346
I'm only somewhat acquainted with Oracle, enough to form an opinion without forming an attachment. In my opinion, Oracle has a lot of "junk in it's trunk" dating back to the 1980s; a lot of cryptic sysadmin commands, old-style SQL syntax, and backward compatibility. In contrast, MySQL is new enough not to suffer from that affliction, and Microsoft periodically deprecates obsolete features from SQL Server (which in my opinion is a good thing). From the perspective of someone coming in new, Oracle's commitment to legacy support is a negative; it makes learning the product more difficult.


"The universe is complicated and for the most part beyond your control, but your life is only as complicated as you choose it to be."
andrew gothard
andrew gothard
SSCertifiable
SSCertifiable (7.6K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.6K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.6K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.6K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.6K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.6K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.6K reputation)SSCertifiable (7.6K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 7580 Visits: 6352
To me, they're not really the same thing. MySQL is more of a replacement for xBase than a proper enterprise product, it's certainly nowhere like Oracle or SQL Server in terms of support for critical systems where your data "matters". Obviously though, the price points are also worlds apart.
MySQL is simpler and regarded as faster due to less overhead for smaller projects. For a Mom n' Pop's corner shop online presence where if the site dies you can rebuild it without breaking into a sweat and no great demands on it, MySQL fits the bill. You wouldn't want them to be storing your medical records in it though (at least I would be horrified at the idea). Certainly a paid license version of Oracle would be colossal overkill and as mentioned above would add both cost and complexity to a small project.
If your data is "important", frequently updated with minimal dataloss requirements and transactional and referential consistency, that's where Oracle would come in.

I'm a DBA.
I'm not paid to solve problems. I'm paid to prevent them.
Luis Cazares
Luis Cazares
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (116K reputation)SSC Guru (116K reputation)SSC Guru (116K reputation)SSC Guru (116K reputation)SSC Guru (116K reputation)SSC Guru (116K reputation)SSC Guru (116K reputation)SSC Guru (116K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 116626 Visits: 21715
andrew gothard (10/3/2016)
To me, they're not really the same thing. MySQL is more of a replacement for xBase than a proper enterprise product, it's certainly nowhere like Oracle or SQL Server in terms of support for critical systems where your data "matters". Obviously though, the price points are also worlds apart.
MySQL is simpler and regarded as faster due to less overhead for smaller projects. For a Mom n' Pop's corner shop online presence where if the site dies you can rebuild it without breaking into a sweat and no great demands on it, MySQL fits the bill. You wouldn't want them to be storing your medical records in it though (at least I would be horrified at the idea). Certainly a paid license version of Oracle would be colossal overkill and as mentioned above would add both cost and complexity to a small project.
If your data is "important", frequently updated with minimal dataloss requirements and transactional and referential consistency, that's where Oracle would come in.


Or you could start with SQL Server Express (free) and do an easy upgrade to Standard or Enterprise.
Here's a link (a bit obsolete) that compares different implementations of SQL database systems. http://troels.arvin.dk/db/rdbms/


Luis C.
General Disclaimer:
Are you seriously taking the advice and code from someone from the internet without testing it? Do you at least understand it? Or can it easily kill your server?


How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help: Option 1 / Option 2
ZZartin
ZZartin
SSCoach
SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)SSCoach (16K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 16287 Visits: 15391
Hmm... the interface for oracle is pretty primitive and very similar to mysql, I hope you like command line :-) But on the back end in terms of what the database engine is actually doing and the capabilities you have as a dba you'll very quickly realize you're dealing with an actual enterprise application vs. a freeware application. Just look at the differences in how backups/restores are handled between them to get an idea.
FridayNightGiant
FridayNightGiant
SSCarpal Tunnel
SSCarpal Tunnel (4.9K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.9K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.9K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.9K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.9K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.9K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.9K reputation)SSCarpal Tunnel (4.9K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 4912 Visits: 3376
ZZartin (10/3/2016)
Hmm... the interface for oracle is pretty primitive and very similar to mysql, I hope you like command line :-) But on the back end in terms of what the database engine is actually doing and the capabilities you have as a dba you'll very quickly realize you're dealing with an actual enterprise application vs. a freeware application. Just look at the differences in how backups/restores are handled between them to get an idea.


Actually if you use Cloud Control - the latest version of the oracle enterprise manager - then the interface is excellent. You can do pretty much anything without going to the command line.
kevaburg
kevaburg
SSChampion
SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 12797 Visits: 1271
FridayNightGiant (10/3/2016)
ZZartin (10/3/2016)
Hmm... the interface for oracle is pretty primitive and very similar to mysql, I hope you like command line :-) But on the back end in terms of what the database engine is actually doing and the capabilities you have as a dba you'll very quickly realize you're dealing with an actual enterprise application vs. a freeware application. Just look at the differences in how backups/restores are handled between them to get an idea.


Actually if you use Cloud Control - the latest version of the oracle enterprise manager - then the interface is excellent. You can do pretty much anything without going to the command line.


Not only that but the newest Version of SQL Developer is quite nifty. I use it alot and even prefer it to some products such as Toad and DBArtisan....and it is free.

On the other side however, I would recommend learning SQL Server over Oracle. The reasoning here is that more and more companies are making exactly that Switch mainly due to TCO and complexity within the Oracle environment.

After working with both RDBMSs over the last 15 years I have found the learning curve with SQL Server on Windows to be much easier to master than Oracle on *nix. There are companies and organisations that run Oracle on Windows but that is like playing Tennis with a Badminton racket.....a terrible mix.....
Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 620043 Visits: 45201
Title of this post:
Difference between MySQL and Oracle? What's better?


Answer: SQL Server. ;-)

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. -- Red Adair

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
kevaburg
kevaburg
SSChampion
SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)SSChampion (12K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 12797 Visits: 1271
Jeff Moden (11/14/2016)
Title of this post:
Difference between MySQL and Oracle? What's better?


Answer: SQL Server. ;-)


and thus start the flame wars.... BigGrin
Jeff Moden
Jeff Moden
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)SSC Guru (620K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 620043 Visits: 45201
kevaburg (11/14/2016)
Jeff Moden (11/14/2016)
Title of this post:
Difference between MySQL and Oracle? What's better?


Answer: SQL Server. ;-)


and thus start the flame wars.... BigGrin


No... no flame wars. Considering that the OP has apparently done zero research on the differences of two very different database engines, I thought I'd throw in a third. We can also throw in NoSQL and a ton of other "engines" because no one engine has everything that might ever occur when it comes to "which is better". The OP even appears oblivious that MySQL has two different engines and, unless you need support, is basically free compared to the rather expensive Oracle.

I really am concerned for those companies and people where people post such questions. It means they've done zero homework and there's no way that a single thread like this one could actually answer such a question. You're talking about something the company or an individual career is going to need to live with for a long time so trivial answers on a thread such as this should not be a driving factor in what a company or individual chooses but frequently is, and it's frightening.

Either that or Yabingooglehoo is broke again. :-D

--Jeff Moden

RBAR is pronounced ree-bar and is a Modenism for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
Stop thinking about what you want to do to a row... think, instead, of what you want to do to a column.
If you think its expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur. -- Red Adair

Helpful Links:
How to post code problems
How to post performance problems
Forum FAQs
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum








































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search