SQL Clone
SQLServerCentral is supported by Redgate
 
Log in  ::  Register  ::  Not logged in
 
 
 


Backing Up/Restore to non-local drive


Backing Up/Restore to non-local drive

Author
Message
YSLGuru
YSLGuru
SSCrazy Eights
SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 8376 Visits: 1670
I've told my IT Admin many times that we don't/can't do SQL DB backups to network shares or anything but a local drive (tape drive or hadr drive). Apparently this is a real source of frustration because today I got en email from him with a link to a hack on how you can backup your SQL Db to a network share. I was just curious as to what you guys (and gals) thoughts are on this. Is this a hack (works but still not a good idea since it is an attempt to circumvent a safe guard) or is it OK to do these days and this restriction is outdated and no longer necessary?

Thanks

http://www.dotnetfunda.com/articles/article1054-database-backup-to-restore-from-remote-server-sql-server-.aspx

Kindest Regards,

Just say No to Facebook!
Lynn Pettis
Lynn Pettis
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 166908 Visits: 39467
YSLGuru (8/24/2012)
I've told my IT Admin many times that we don't/can't do SQL DB backups to network shares or anything but a local drive (tape drive or hadr drive). Apparently this is a real source of frustration because today I got en email from him with a link to a hack on how you can backup your SQL Db to a network share. I was just curious as to what you guys (and gals) thoughts are on this. Is this a hack (works but still not a good idea since it is an attempt to circumvent a safe guard) or is it OK to do these days and this restriction is outdated and no longer necessary?

Thanks

http://www.dotnetfunda.com/articles/article1054-database-backup-to-restore-from-remote-server-sql-server-.aspx


Yes, you can do backups to UNC locations. The problem I have seen doing them is all it takes is a little network hiccup and the backup fails. SQL Server is not very forgiving when it comes to network issues while writing a backup to a remote resource. This is why you normally hear the "backup local, move to remote" mantra used many times.

I have yet to work in an organization that had a network solid enough to ensure that backups to a UNC would always work, but I am also not saying that there aren't networks out there that do meet this requirement.

Cool
Lynn Pettis

For better assistance in answering your questions, click here
For tips to get better help with Performance Problems, click here
For Running Totals and its variations, click here or when working with partitioned tables
For more about Tally Tables, click here
For more about Cross Tabs and Pivots, click here and here
Managing Transaction Logs

SQL Musings from the Desert Fountain Valley SQL (My Mirror Blog)
YSLGuru
YSLGuru
SSCrazy Eights
SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 8376 Visits: 1670
Lynn Pettis (8/24/2012)
YSLGuru (8/24/2012)
I've told my IT Admin many times that we don't/can't do SQL DB backups to network shares or anything but a local drive (tape drive or hadr drive). Apparently this is a real source of frustration because today I got en email from him with a link to a hack on how you can backup your SQL Db to a network share. I was just curious as to what you guys (and gals) thoughts are on this. Is this a hack (works but still not a good idea since it is an attempt to circumvent a safe guard) or is it OK to do these days and this restriction is outdated and no longer necessary?

Thanks

http://www.dotnetfunda.com/articles/article1054-database-backup-to-restore-from-remote-server-sql-server-.aspx


Yes, you can do backups to UNC locations. The problem I have seen doing them is all it takes is a little network hiccup and the backup fails. SQL Server is not very forgiving when it comes to network issues while writing a backup to a remote resource. This is why you normally hear the "backup local, move to remote" mantra used many times.

I have yet to work in an organization that had a network solid enough to ensure that backups to a UNC would always work, but I am also not saying that there aren't networks out there that do meet this requirement.


SO then this is still a work-a-round/hack hybrid; something you can do but you are circumventing a safety measure that is in place for a very good reason, yes?

Thanks Lynn

Kindest Regards,

Just say No to Facebook!
Lynn Pettis
Lynn Pettis
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)SSC Guru (166K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 166908 Visits: 39467
Not saying it is a hack, of course I haven't checked the link/article you mention. I am speaking from experience. I have backed up to a file share, and I have had backups fail due to network issues while doing so. It is one of the reasons I have always pushed to have sufficient space to on my servers to complete backups locally even if I then needed to move them to a central location to be backed up to tape.

I have also done restores from UNC's (file shares). The tened to be slower than copying the file to a local directory then restoring, but I never had a restore fail over the network. Now that networks are getting faster, doing the restore over the network is getting better, but I still like backing up locally then moving rather than backing up over the network.

Cool
Lynn Pettis

For better assistance in answering your questions, click here
For tips to get better help with Performance Problems, click here
For Running Totals and its variations, click here or when working with partitioned tables
For more about Tally Tables, click here
For more about Cross Tabs and Pivots, click here and here
Managing Transaction Logs

SQL Musings from the Desert Fountain Valley SQL (My Mirror Blog)
YSLGuru
YSLGuru
SSCrazy Eights
SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)SSCrazy Eights (8.4K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 8376 Visits: 1670
Lynn Pettis (8/24/2012)
Not saying it is a hack, of course I haven't checked the link/article you mention. I am speaking from experience. I have backed up to a file share, and I have had backups fail due to network issues while doing so. It is one of the reasons I have always pushed to have sufficient space to on my servers to complete backups locally even if I then needed to move them to a central location to be backed up to tape.

I have also done restores from UNC's (file shares). The tened to be slower than copying the file to a local directory then restoring, but I never had a restore fail over the network. Now that networks are getting faster, doing the restore over the network is getting better, but I still like backing up locally then moving rather than backing up over the network.


Met too. I'd rather not risk several hours only to find at the very end that the backup is bad because something went bad near the end . Thanks

Kindest Regards,

Just say No to Facebook!
andersg98
andersg98
Hall of Fame
Hall of Fame (3.1K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.1K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.1K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.1K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.1K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.1K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.1K reputation)Hall of Fame (3.1K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 3122 Visits: 799
I agree with all the posts that I would prefer to back up to a directly attached disk then move the backup to a network share for Archiving. However, even after sharing all the reasons and comments from this forum and others I am always forced to backup to network shares. We have large clustered servers that host several databases making it cost prohibitive to add enough attached storage to hold our backups. There are network hiccups from time to time but our monitoring processes look for databases that have not been backed up with SLA timeframes and runs a backup if not found. We rarely have trouble with the backups to network shares even though I am not fond of the overall concept.



Lowell
Lowell
SSC Guru
SSC Guru (137K reputation)SSC Guru (137K reputation)SSC Guru (137K reputation)SSC Guru (137K reputation)SSC Guru (137K reputation)SSC Guru (137K reputation)SSC Guru (137K reputation)SSC Guru (137K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 137590 Visits: 41516
andersg98 makes me think you could do a proof of concept;
create a new job that does a COPY ONLY with verify backup to the network share;
set it to run 100 times or so, and report the % of failures for the backup after that;
if the failure rate is not zero, for me it's not an option.

then you could argue for more harddrive space a lot easier.

Lowell
--help us help you! If you post a question, make sure you include a CREATE TABLE... statement and INSERT INTO... statement into that table to give the volunteers here representative data. with your description of the problem, we can provide a tested, verifiable solution to your question! asking the question the right way gets you a tested answer the fastest way possible!
Michael Valentine Jones
Michael Valentine Jones
One Orange Chip
One Orange Chip (26K reputation)One Orange Chip (26K reputation)One Orange Chip (26K reputation)One Orange Chip (26K reputation)One Orange Chip (26K reputation)One Orange Chip (26K reputation)One Orange Chip (26K reputation)One Orange Chip (26K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 26574 Visits: 11930
At a former job I managed backups for over 300 SQL Servers, and all of them were backed up to UNC locations on file servers dedicated to SQL Server backups. We did daily full backups and transaction log backups every 15 minutes for all production databases (4000+). We had only had occasional backup failures, and they were mostly transaction log backups that run OK on the next 15 cycle.

As long as the file servers and SQL Server have good network bandwidth, and the disk arrays on the file servers have enough speed to support the backups, you should be OK. Don't make the mistake of thinking that you can skimp on network and disk speed.

Backups to a UNC location are usually a little slower, but we were backing up some databases that were over 1 TB in size with no problem. I recommend that you use backup compression whenever possible to speed up the backups.
Jeffrey Williams 3188
Jeffrey Williams 3188
SSC-Dedicated
SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)SSC-Dedicated (34K reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 34592 Visits: 10097
Michael Valentine Jones (8/27/2012)
At a former job I managed backups for over 300 SQL Servers, and all of them were backed up to UNC locations on file servers dedicated to SQL Server backups. We did daily full backups and transaction log backups every 15 minutes for all production databases (4000+). We had only had occasional backup failures, and they were mostly transaction log backups that run OK on the next 15 cycle.

As long as the file servers and SQL Server have good network bandwidth, and the disk arrays on the file servers have enough speed to support the backups, you should be OK. Don't make the mistake of thinking that you can skimp on network and disk speed.

Backups to a UNC location are usually a little slower, but we were backing up some databases that were over 1 TB in size with no problem. I recommend that you use backup compression whenever possible to speed up the backups.


At a previous site - we also backed up to UNC with little or no issues. Yes, it was a bit slower - but still within the maintenance windows for all of the servers involved.

One thing we did was create a separate backup network. We added additional NIC's to each system and routed traffic by IP address over the backup network. This helped quite a bit because we were no longer competing with the public network.

Jeffrey Williams
Problems are opportunities brilliantly disguised as insurmountable obstacles.

How to post questions to get better answers faster
Managing Transaction Logs

tim.cloud
tim.cloud
SSC-Addicted
SSC-Addicted (424 reputation)SSC-Addicted (424 reputation)SSC-Addicted (424 reputation)SSC-Addicted (424 reputation)SSC-Addicted (424 reputation)SSC-Addicted (424 reputation)SSC-Addicted (424 reputation)SSC-Addicted (424 reputation)

Group: General Forum Members
Points: 424 Visits: 349
I've been on both extremes. I used to work for a major oil company, and we backed up hundreds of SQL servers across a WAN from Oklahoma City, OK to Calgary, Canada. It was very slow, but it worked. Now I work for an equally large company and we won't stand up a SQL Server unless it has a big enough local partition. That is the way I beleive it should be. Just my opinion.
Go


Permissions

You can't post new topics.
You can't post topic replies.
You can't post new polls.
You can't post replies to polls.
You can't edit your own topics.
You can't delete your own topics.
You can't edit other topics.
You can't delete other topics.
You can't edit your own posts.
You can't edit other posts.
You can't delete your own posts.
You can't delete other posts.
You can't post events.
You can't edit your own events.
You can't edit other events.
You can't delete your own events.
You can't delete other events.
You can't send private messages.
You can't send emails.
You can read topics.
You can't vote in polls.
You can't upload attachments.
You can download attachments.
You can't post HTML code.
You can't edit HTML code.
You can't post IFCode.
You can't post JavaScript.
You can post emoticons.
You can't post or upload images.

Select a forum







































































































































































SQLServerCentral


Search