What's a Normal SQL Server?

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 720094

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item What's a Normal SQL Server?

  • DinoRS

    SSCrazy

    Points: 2679

    What is a normal SQL Server? I think that question is rather simple: One that manages to keep up with demands from the business side.

    There are systems you can't put a 100% CPU Load on (OLTP Systems mostly for responsiveness), so you might add more cores there while on a DWH Server you're rather happy if you can make most of the CPU Cores you have - so a 100% CPU Load is fine as long as it get's done faster than with ~ 50% CPU Load.

    Even the size of a DB doesn't tell it's full story: What about that varchar(max) column in your 500 Millon Rows Fact table which returns for max(len(Column)) 37? What about those 70+GB of Schema_Only InMemory Table? I'd love to see how efficient those DBs are in regards to datatypes but ofcourse that would be a bit much for Brents' Services to report back I guess.

  • nicksamuel

    Valued Member

    Points: 70

    "2016 is the most popular. This was a major release … … ... 2017 were relatively minor releases". Yes, well, if you are a DBA you would think this but developers had to wait for 2017 for many of the promised improvements.

  • DinoRS

    SSCrazy

    Points: 2679

    Indeed, even tho SQL Server 2017 is a minor upgrade over SQL Server 2016 I find it from a Dev perspective much more compelling and when asked if I'd like to go with 2016, 2017 or 2019 I'd actually take 2019, Master Data Services no longer uses Silverlight but HTML5 which means we can finally get rid of Internet Explorer.

    If the choice is between 2016 and 2017, it'd be 2017.

    Fun fact: My current customer asked me this very question roughly 2 years ago and I went with 2017, last year (while we're still in the middle of things) I wish I could've switched over to 2019 before things were even done, simply to be able to get rid of Silverlight.

    Not saying I wouldn't love quite a few features from 2019 but when you meet MDS once in your life you'll value anything that gets rid of Silverlight like your new born child.

  • Elfstone

    Grasshopper

    Points: 14

    So it seems you don't like Silverlight very much!

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 720094

    I don' t mean to imply SQL 2017 isn't a good product (or 2014 for that matter), but for most people, this isn't a compelling change to move off 2016. You might prefer it in your situation, which is fine. Every edition gets some (small) percentage of people to move, even if they just moved, but not many.

  • nicksamuel

    Valued Member

    Points: 70

    DinoRS - I have been trying to persuade my current employers to use MDS in their new development and now they have decided to move to Azure. So that has scuppered it.

  • DinoRS

    SSCrazy

    Points: 2679

    Well Elfstone, on the one hand you're trying to get rid of IExplorer.exe but you're forced to keep it around because of Silverlight. How would you feel about that? If you're not aware: getting rid of IE has something to do with SW LifeCycle and Security.

    nicksamuel, that's really unfortunate. I guess all you can do right now is upvote this.

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