tSQLt AssertEqualsString

  • leeholden

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 183

    Is it possible to force a case sensitive comparison?

    ie. i want this to fail:


    EXEC tsqlt.AssertEqualsString 'Test','test';

  • drew.allen

    SSC Guru

    Points: 76413

    Use a case sensitive collation in your test.  It's simple enough that you really don't need a stored procedure.

    SELECT CASE WHEN 'Test' = 'test' COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS_KS_WS THEN 1 ELSE 0 END

    Drew

    J. Drew Allen
    Business Intelligence Analyst
    Philadelphia, PA


    How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help[/url].How to Post Performance Problems[/url]

  • leeholden

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 183

    Thanks, but I am trying to do this using the tSQLt testing framework. I guess I can work around  it, by saving the result of the above and asserting a comparison to that, if it's a limitation of the framework procedure.

  • Lynn Pettis

    SSC Guru

    Points: 442094

    leeholden - Wednesday, August 8, 2018 11:32 AM

    Thanks, but I am trying to do this using the tSQLt testing framework. I guess I can work around  it, by saving the result of the above and asserting a comparison to that, if it's a limitation of the framework procedure.

    May not be a limitation of the framework.  What is the collation used in the database you are doing the testing?

  • leeholden

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 183

    The collation is Latin1_General_CI_AS, but I've created a function that camel cases the input, so the test needs to check the casing.

    the rest of my test code looks something like this


    DECLARE @expected VARCHAR(100), @actual VARCHAR(100);

    SET @actual = dbo.ToCamelCase('my test value');
    SET @expected = 'MyTestValue';

    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEqualsString @expected, @actual;

    There for the value of 'mytestcase' should return failed.

    Maybe this will work?

    DECLARE @expected VARCHAR(100), @actual VARCHAR(100);

    SET @actual = dbo.ToCamelCase('my test value') COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS;
    SET @expected = 'MyTestValue' COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS;

    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEqualsString @expected, @actual;

  • drew.allen

    SSC Guru

    Points: 76413

    leeholden - Wednesday, August 8, 2018 1:18 PM

    The collation is Latin1_General_CI_AS, but I've created a function that camel cases the input, so the test needs to check the casing.

    the rest of my test code looks something like this


    DECLARE @expected VARCHAR(100), @actual VARCHAR(100);

    SET @actual = dbo.ToCamelCase('my test value');
    SET @expected = 'MyTestValue';

    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEqualsString @expected, @actual;

    There for the value of 'mytestcase' should return failed.

    Maybe this will work?

    DECLARE @expected VARCHAR(100), @actual VARCHAR(100);

    SET @actual = dbo.ToCamelCase('my test value') COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS;
    SET @expected = 'MyTestValue' COLLATE Latin1_General_CS_AS;

    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEqualsString @expected, @actual;

    We can't answer this without knowing the definition of tQSLt.AssertEqualsString.

    Drew

    J. Drew Allen
    Business Intelligence Analyst
    Philadelphia, PA


    How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help[/url].How to Post Performance Problems[/url]

  • leeholden

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 183

    drew.allen - Wednesday, August 8, 2018 2:38 PM

    We can't answer this without knowing the definition of tQSLt.AssertEqualsString.

    Drew

    It's not mine,  it's part of the tSQLt Testing Framework: https://tsqlt.org
    The question is specific to the framework, not a general T-SQL question. Just thought someone here may have had experience with it.

  • jonathan.crawford

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6254

    leeholden - Wednesday, August 8, 2018 3:21 PM

    drew.allen - Wednesday, August 8, 2018 2:38 PM

    We can't answer this without knowing the definition of tQSLt.AssertEqualsString.

    Drew

    It's not mine,  it's part of the tSQLt Testing Framework: https://tsqlt.org
    The question is specific to the framework, not a general T-SQL question. Just thought someone here may have had experience with it.

    the documentation says nothing either way about case sensitivity, so I went to look at the source code at https://github.com/tSQLt-org/tSQLt/blob/master/Source/tSQLt.AssertEqualsString.ssp.sql

    looks like it literally checks @Expected = @Actual, so it's about how the SQL operator compares string values.

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  • DesNorton

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 22441

    You could always extend tSQLt by writing your own case-sensitive assertion.  It's just a stored proc.
    Then you could call
    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEqualsStringCS @expected, @actual;


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    Make sure that you include code in the appropriate IFCode tags.

  • leeholden

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 183

    DesNorton - Thursday, August 9, 2018 1:26 AM

    You could always extend tSQLt by writing your own case-sensitive assertion.  It's just a stored proc.
    Then you could call
    EXEC tSQLt.AssertEqualsStringCS @expected, @actual;

    This was my next thought too - thanks

  • Lynn Pettis

    SSC Guru

    Points: 442094

    I think it may come down to the collation of the database where these tests are being run.

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