The Path

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 715344

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item The Path

  • HappyGeek

    SSCoach

    Points: 18657

    Good question, nice and easy for a Friday, thanks

    ...

  • This was removed by the editor as SPAM

  • TomThomson

    SSC Guru

    Points: 104765

    Nice question, but ambiguous wording in the explanation - "up to " can mean either "up to and including" or "up to but not including ".

    Sometimes the context makes it obvious which is meant: in "he drove his sword in up to the guard" it means "up to and not including", while in "he went up to the top of the hill" it means "up to and including". Sometimes the context doesn't make it obvious. In this explanation the context is that the reader is looking to discover whether the intent is "including" or "not including", so it is careless not to specify that.

    Tom

  • sknox

    SSChampion

    Points: 12219

    TomThomson (2/19/2016)


    Nice question, but ambiguous wording in the explanation - "up to " can mean either "up to and including" or "up to but not including ".

    Sometimes the context makes it obvious which is meant: in "he drove his sword in up to the guard" it means "up to and not including", while in "he went up to the top of the hill" it means "up to and including". Sometimes the context doesn't make it obvious. In this explanation the context is that the reader is looking to discover whether the intent is "including" or "not including", so it is careless not to specify that.

    Well, if we're being pedantic, "he went up to the top of the hill" does not use the phrase "up to". In that sentence "up" is an adverb modifying "went" and "to" is a preposition. A better example of "up to" meaning "up to and including" would be "you could win up to a million dollars."

    Since the possible answers specified "up to, and including" it is clear from the overall context that "up to" in the explanation, not having ", and including" appended, means "up to but not including."

  • Marcia J

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5628

    Nice fun question to end the week.:-)

  • webrunner

    One Orange Chip

    Points: 29896

    Thanks - great question.

    - webrunner

    -------------------
    A SQL query walks into a bar and sees two tables. He walks up to them and says Can I join you?
    Ref.: http://tkyte.blogspot.com/2009/02/sql-joke.html

  • Revenant

    SSC-Forever

    Points: 42467

    Nice and easy - thanks, Steve!

  • chgn01

    Hall of Fame

    Points: 3525

    The question did not tell us what data type and how many characters it is. So the correcter answer will be depend on. for example:

    declare @myString char(12);

    set @myString ='My\Str\ing';

    SELECT LEFT(@MyString, LEN(@MyString) - CHARINDEX('\', REVERSE(@MyString)));

    --------------------------------------
    ;-)“Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it.” ― Confucius

  • Ed Wagner

    SSC Guru

    Points: 286957

    I thought it was a good, straightforward question. Thanks.

  • akljfhnlaflkj

    SSC Guru

    Points: 76202

    Thanks for the question.

  • stephen.long.1

    SSCrazy

    Points: 2568

    Nice question, Steve. Thanks!

  • Koen Verbeeck

    SSC Guru

    Points: 258924

    Great question, thanks.

    Need an answer? No, you need a question
    My blog at https://sqlkover.com.
    MCSE Business Intelligence - Microsoft Data Platform MVP

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