The Hybrid Cloud

  • Comments posted to this topic are about the item The Hybrid Cloud

  • I think I'm tired. I'm struggling to understand this topic sadly 🙁

  • I'm at the other end of the scale, waking up too early and ready to go.

    If there's something that you have a question about, please feel free to ask. The idea of hybrid, and Azure Stack are certainly somewhat complex.

  • Easiest to understand in a web scenario. Right now, I could use the Azure Portal to provision a web server from some template. That would include the files for the app, the connection strings,etc. and scale that up or down, adding or removing copies. I can actually do that with VMs or services, where the scale up/down happens based on some programmatic control or someone clicking.

    Azure stack allows a similar portal to manage both on-premises and cloud resources together, so that I could start with 2 IIS services on premises (either VMs or the service) and then have another added if load grew (or removed if load shrank). However, I could also add a 4th or 5th in the cloud, which would have the same config as on premises, essentially bursting up.

    There are other services that MS is building to  allow this to work in a flexible manner. OpenStack does this now for the open source side with AWS, so you can provision different resources that might be on prem or in AWS, smoothing the up/down nature of your business without users necessarily being aware.

  • We have a hybrid on-prem / Azure environment. We've ported some servers to Azure and never looked back. These are line of business OLTP servers. We've also ported some servers to IaaS, discovered it wasn't cost effective and too much of a performance hit, and then fell back to managing them on-prem. These are data warehouse servers receiving ETL loads from serveral different sources, some of them on-prem. We're now re-architecting our infrastructure to remove legacy processes, and the end game is probably to have all servers in Azure.

    "Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Instead, seek what they sought." - Matsuo Basho

  • This is very interesting. I've been working more and more with Azure, and really loving it. Haven't had fun like this in a few years. I know that we're thinking of moving some of our applications to Azure, but I'm also aware of that fact that not everything is going there. I'm still new enough at Azure to not know all of the issues. I struggle with IT blocking some of the simplest of things. And I certainly don't know what the costs are, at this point. For the most point I've only been using my MSDN subscription to access Azure. Once my monthly allotment runs out, its out. Everything stops, until next month. That's certainly not the way it's going to work in production. So, there's a lot of issues impacting more things than I've ever had to deal with before. I appreciate the need to be careful about all of this. Looks like Azure Stack or AWS's OpenStack really address these complexities.

    Kindest Regards, Rod Connect with me on LinkedIn.

  • I was really enamored with Azure as a service last week.  :Whistling:

  • Rod at work - Monday, September 10, 2018 9:13 AM

    This is very interesting. I've been working more and more with Azure, and really loving it. Haven't had fun like this in a few years. I know that we're thinking of moving some of our applications to Azure, but I'm also aware of that fact that not everything is going there. I'm still new enough at Azure to not know all of the issues. I struggle with IT blocking some of the simplest of things. And I certainly don't know what the costs are, at this point. For the most point I've only been using my MSDN subscription to access Azure. Once my monthly allotment runs out, its out. Everything stops, until next month. That's certainly not the way it's going to work in production. So, there's a lot of issues impacting more things than I've ever had to deal with before. I appreciate the need to be careful about all of this. Looks like Azure Stack or AWS's OpenStack really address these complexities.

    For $5 / month, you can lease an Azure SQL instance with 5 DTU and 2 GB of storage, and for $15 / month you can get 10 DTU and 250 GB storage.

    "Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Instead, seek what they sought." - Matsuo Basho

  • Eric M Russell - Monday, September 10, 2018 11:35 AM

    Rod at work - Monday, September 10, 2018 9:13 AM

    This is very interesting. I've been working more and more with Azure, and really loving it. Haven't had fun like this in a few years. I know that we're thinking of moving some of our applications to Azure, but I'm also aware of that fact that not everything is going there. I'm still new enough at Azure to not know all of the issues. I struggle with IT blocking some of the simplest of things. And I certainly don't know what the costs are, at this point. For the most point I've only been using my MSDN subscription to access Azure. Once my monthly allotment runs out, its out. Everything stops, until next month. That's certainly not the way it's going to work in production. So, there's a lot of issues impacting more things than I've ever had to deal with before. I appreciate the need to be careful about all of this. Looks like Azure Stack or AWS's OpenStack really address these complexities.

    For $5 / month, you can lease an Azure SQL instance with 5 DTU and 2 GB of storage, and for $15 / month you can get 10 DTU and 250 GB storage.

    For home, I might do that. But here at work, I can't do anything like that.

    BTW, I've read about DTU's in the Azure documentation, but didn't get it. I know it's a measurement of the number of units that can be read during a period of time. I presume it's a month. Is that correct?

    Kindest Regards, Rod Connect with me on LinkedIn.

  • Eric M Russell - Monday, September 10, 2018 7:21 AM

    We have a hybrid on-prem / Azure environment. We've ported some servers to Azure and never looked back. These are line of business OLTP servers. We've also ported some servers to IaaS, discovered it wasn't cost effective and too much of a performance hit, and then fell back to managing them on-prem. These are data warehouse servers receiving ETL loads from serveral different sources, some of them on-prem. We're now re-architecting our infrastructure to remove legacy processes, and the end game is probably to have all servers in Azure.

    If you get there, that would be an interesting case study or article. If you could discuss it, the move to and move back would be good as well

  • chrisn-585491 - Monday, September 10, 2018 11:00 AM

    I was really enamored with Azure as a service last week.  :Whistling:

    It happens, and as the services grow, the vendors have to learn how to scale. They'll make some mistakes.

    The same thing happens on prem, and I've had more than a day of downtime in house for various reasons. I think Azure, overall, recovered pretty well.

  • I've ported most of my stuff to Azure, but I still run some stuff on-prem only because I don't want to be responsible for managing them (as in, I have a global IT team that does it for me). I really like being a bit hybrid because the organization I'm in is very large and they have are between both too. Having that interconnection from active directory and beyond is pretty beast.

    But, I think as time goes on, I will be fully in the cloud as there is just so many benefits to having full control versus going through a lot of red tape with on-prem as in budgets for hardware and so forth.

  • Thanks Steve et al, I'm getting a better picture. We use AWS which I'm happy with but OpenStack etc is all new to me. Looking at the OpenStack site explanations haven't especially elucidated me.

    Like this pdf.

  • call.copse - Tuesday, September 11, 2018 2:36 AM

    Thanks Steve et al, I'm getting a better picture. We use AWS which I'm happy with but OpenStack etc is all new to me. Looking at the OpenStack site explanations haven't especially elucidated me.

    Like this pdf.

    Here's a few things I've seen. Platform 9 has written extensions so that you can manage both resources together.

    https://platform9.com/blog/openstack-hybrid-cloud-aws/

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor - Monday, September 10, 2018 2:42 PM

    If you get there, that would be an interesting case study or article. If you could discuss it, the move to and move back would be good as well

    Well, for one thing, when migrating a server to Azure IaaS, simply copying a VM or physical image to Azure wasn't an option. I guess that's asking too much. We first had to provision the server (which did at least include the option of having a base SQL Server Enterprise / Standard), transfer licenses, and then we had to go through the process of copying over .bak files, restoring databases, re-installing and re-configuring all of our applications like MDS, SSAS, etc. Also, the same process in reverse when falling back from Azure to on-prem. That's a pain in the butt when dealing with dozens of database and application servers.

    If someone here knows about an option to move server images between Azure and an on-prem data center, then I'd like to hear about that.

    "Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Instead, seek what they sought." - Matsuo Basho

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