Surfing

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 715401

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item Surfing

  • RonKyle

    SSC-Dedicated

    Points: 31457

    A very interesting analogy. Thanks!

  • akljfhnlaflkj

    SSC Guru

    Points: 76202

    I am nearing the end of my journey. I'm nearly 65 and expect perhaps a few more years or so working. But I've been provided an opportunity to ride a new wave, do something dramatically different than coding. It should be an exciting end to my career.

  • webrunner

    One Orange Chip

    Points: 29902

    Great comparison - thanks for the thought-provoking editorial!

    - webrunner

    -------------------
    A SQL query walks into a bar and sees two tables. He walks up to them and says Can I join you?
    Ref.: http://tkyte.blogspot.com/2009/02/sql-joke.html

  • chrisn-585491

    SSCoach

    Points: 15866

    I'm still paddling...

    Just talked to someone about a position that pays 1.5 times my current salary. Turns out I'm over-experienced/over-qualified for it... :crazy:

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 715401

    chrisn-585491 (8/25/2015)


    I'm still paddling...

    Just talked to someone about a position that pays 1.5 times my current salary. Turns out I'm over-experienced/over-qualified for it... :crazy:

    Take it. Redo your resume, sell them on your ability to do the job, and add more value where needed.

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 715401

    chrisn-585491 (8/25/2015)


    I'm still paddling...

    Just talked to someone about a position that pays 1.5 times my current salary. Turns out I'm over-experienced/over-qualified for it... :crazy:

    Take it. Redo your resume, and sell them on the fact you can add value on top of the job.

  • zgardiner 4991

    SSC-Addicted

    Points: 461

    I've never felt compelled to comment on SQL Server Central before, but this editorial is very personal to me. Long before I ever knew what a database even was, around the time I got my first Apple IIc, I caught my first wave. 30 years later and surfing is still as exciting to me as it was on that summer day in 1984. I feel the same way about databases and programming in general and I'm lucky, because the hardest part of my day is usually deciding whether to go in early to work, or catch the sunrise and some waves, depending on what alerts are hitting my email that is, my databases or Surfline.

    "I saw someone post a note that working in technology is like surfing waves. As we learn and grow, we often feel that we can't slow down, or change directions very much. If we're a SQL Server DBA, we're riding that wave. Trying to slow our career, or move to another technology means (often) abandoning some of what has worked well for us. We really follow the wave we've chosen as often as possible, usually resistant to change. "

    I decided to post because of the paragraph above. I joined the tech industry during the dark days of 2000 doing support for over-the-phone DSL installs. Since then I've built websites, configured telephony systems, worked in a PMO, in quality assurance, in finance, education, and the gaming industries. When I was first getting started in IT, I felt like I had very little control over my career and the path it was taking. In 2001, I knew that I wanted to "work with databases"; but I had no idea how to go about doing it, so I just kind of "paddled out", let the current take me where it would, and kind of just flopped around. In surfing parlance, I was a "kook". And in the years that have followed, I've worked hard to acquire the knowledge to do my job and as I learned a little more, it opened up new doors and I added to my bag of tricks. And as I've become a better developer/dba, I've personally experienced the opposite so that rather than feeling like "As we learn and grow, we often feel that we can't slow down, or change directions very much", I feel like I have so many more options available to me.

    One of the things that separates a "surfer" from a "kook" is the ability to be in control of our environment and display some kind of mastery of our craft. In the water, I've seen so many terrible accidents occur because of a novice flailing around, without any idea of what they are doing, completely out of control and at the mercy of the wave, and anyone who's in the way, watch out! I can't count the times in IT I've witnessed a knee jerk reaction to a problem or a poorly thought out execution that has resulted in client and end user impact. Experienced surfers practice the same moves over-and-over-and-over again until they're sure that they've got it right. And they do it in a rapidly changing environment with constant resetting of benchmarks and milestones. Sounds familiar, huh?

    I used to get disheartened when I'd read Grant Fritchey, or Brent Ozar, or Gail Shaw; thinking I would never be as "good" as they are. And then I met some of them and figured out that they were just regular folks who were dedicated to what they do. Professional surfer Taj Burrows wrote, "the only difference between you and me is time in the water and commitment." When you see a surfer in the water who makes it look easy, who can use the whole wave and even the air above as their personal playground, who can turn on a dime, stall into a barrel, or throw buckets; you are looking at someone who spent years and years mastering those skills.

    Experience counts. Slide On

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 715401

    Nice post, and thanks, zgardiner 4991

  • David.Poole

    SSC Guru

    Points: 75182

    And as with surfing the time it goes well makes the 100 times you fell worth while.

  • Lempster

    SSCoach

    Points: 15476

    Steve, you are completely right when you say "life is short". This has just been brought home to me in a very personal way as I have just been diagnosed with a brain tumor. Clearly right now I have much more important things to worry about than work, but what I will say is that as well as being open to trying new technologies and changes in career path, if you find yourself in a job that you love, working for a great company, then by all means stick with it. There is no sense in change for change's sake.

    Work to live, don't live to work.

    Regards

    Lempster

  • sharmajai966

    Newbie

    Points: 7

    I think one should not be constricted to one technology only. If anyone has experience of Oracle and RDBMS than learning another database is lot easier. It would be just a matter of practice and time you take understand new names of old terminology. Key is accept new rdbms wholeheartedly. Do not be a die hard fan of any rdbms or tech.

    Keep learning keep growing

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 715401

    Lempster (8/26/2015)


    Steve, you are completely right when you say "life is short". This has just been brought home to me in a very personal way as I have just been diagnosed with a brain tumor. Clearly right now I have much more important things to worry about than work, but what I will say is that as well as being open to trying new technologies and changes in career path, if you find yourself in a job that you love, working for a great company, then by all means stick with it. There is no sense in change for change's sake.

    Work to live, don't live to work.

    Regards

    Lempster

    Ugh, I hope all goes well for you. My thoughts and prayers.

  • Lempster

    SSCoach

    Points: 15476

    Thanks Steve, appreciate that. It's going to be a tough fight, but again, that has some relevance with careers: sometimes you have to battle through rather than jumping ship.

  • Gary Varga

    SSC Guru

    Points: 82166

    Just read the article as I am still playing catchup following spinal surgery in July so Lempster's comments really hit the mark for me. I was going to add a comment on the surfing analogy but instead I will just wish Lempster and everyone else the best.

    Gaz

    -- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!

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