SQL Clusters

  • dave.dunckley

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 161

    Hello all,

    I have just returned from a Microsoft course - "Designing high availability database solutions using sql server 2005" - where the trainer told us that both nodes of a clustor must have the same hardware.

    Howerver the network guys here are sure it can be done, and after a google search it would seam it can.

    Has any one ever set up a cluster with diffrent hardware on each node. For example a faster prosseor or more ram on the second node? Or does any oen know if it can be sone?

    Thanks for your help.

    Dave

  • george sibbald

    SSC Guru

    Points: 104200

    the nodes don't have to haver the same config in terms of no of cpus, RAM etc, but what the trainer was probably trying to get across was that each node should be able to support the load should it become the active node.

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  • dave.dunckley

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 161

    No he was saying that he has known of people buting old server from ebay to match the existing node they have. Just cos they have to be the same.

    So I am a little confussed still.

  • Andy Hogg

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4525

    I think that historically, certainly some of the earlier clustering solutions required identical hardware on each node of a cluster.

    When using the old Vinca Standby Server product for example, identical hardware was essential. It was even necessary to get the NICs on both nodes using the same IRQs.

    This isn't the case with Microsoft clustering (or probably any of the other 3rd party clustering solutions available these days).

    The nodes of an MS cluster can be of a completely different spec. Nothing even to stop you having an HP GL580 for one node and a Dell PowerEdge for the other.

    Most folk do tend to use the same kit for both nodes given the choice though.

    As mentioned previously, it's a good idea to at least try to have a similar amount of horsepower in both to ensure that in the event of a failover the second node is able to cope.

  • Steve-3_5_7_9

    SSChampion

    Points: 10832

    What Windows Server OS?

    It's probably because of the "Microsoft Support". MS tends to give answers based on what they support, or if they'll support it. This link talks about MS support for a Windows Server 2008 cluster, but also refers to previous cluster support. Essentially now, if the 2008 cluster passes the "cluster validation test" then it's supported by MS. In the past, the cluster would have to be listed on the "Windows Server Catalog Web site". Check out the link.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732035%28WS.10%29.aspx

    Steve

  • dave.dunckley

    SSC Enthusiast

    Points: 161

    Great thanks for that steve. Just what I needed

  • Steve-3_5_7_9

    SSChampion

    Points: 10832

    You're welcome.

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