Spatial Data Types

  • CoolCodeShare

    SSCrazy

    Points: 2584

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item Spatial Data Types

  • Carlo Romagnano

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 21794

    I'd like deepen the argument, but i've limited time.

  • Ola L Martins-329921

    Mr or Mrs. 500

    Points: 542

    It's a good question - I didn't know these new types!

    But, the answers rule out themselves - you actually cannot get this one wrong with logical deduction:

    If #3 is true neither #1 or #2 can be true, (since they include references of both types) leading to

    a maximum of 2 true alternatives. Given it should be three true alternatives leads to the

    correct conclusion that #1, #2 and #4 are the true statements.

  • Michael Riemer

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4904

    Ola L Martins-329921 (10/26/2011)


    It's a good question - I didn't know these new types!

    But, the answers rule out themselves - you actually cannot get this one wrong with logical deduction:

    If #3 is true neither #1 or #2 can be true, (since they include references of both types) leading to

    a maximum of 2 true alternatives. Given it should be three true alternatives leads to the

    correct conclusion that #1, #2 and #4 are the true statements.

    And yet 32% of people still get it wrong... 😛

    A good reminder of additional features available.

  • M&M

    SSC-Insane

    Points: 21679

    Good question on a nice topic.

    M&M

  • Jan Van der Eecken

    SSCrazy Eights

    Points: 8890

    Unhm, what am I missing here? According to MSDN, "A LineString is a one-dimensional object representing a sequence of points and the line segments connecting them.", so it is actually an instance of the geometry data type, and not the geography type as answer 4 suggests?

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  • Andre Guerreiro

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 7319

    Such an easy question since you are allowed to create columns of type GEOMETRY.

    I'm amazed that 41% got it wrong.

    Maybe it's because of the answer #4 that can lead to confusion?

    Thank you.

    Best regards,

    Best regards,

    Andre Guerreiro Neto

    Database Analyst
    http://www.softplan.com.br
    MCITPx1/MCTSx2/MCSE/MCSA

  • rfr.ferrari

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6879

    very good question!!!!

    thanks!


    [font="Times New Roman"]rfr.ferrari[/font]
    DBA - SQL Server 2008
    MCITP | MCTS

    remember is live or suffer twice!
    the period you fastest growing is the most difficult period of your life!
  • TomThomson

    SSC Guru

    Points: 104772

    Nice question, thanks.

    Tom

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  • tilew-948340

    Hall of Fame

    Points: 3431

    Jan Van der Eecken (10/26/2011)


    Unhm, what am I missing here? According to MSDN, "A LineString is a one-dimensional object representing a sequence of points and the line segments connecting them.", so it is actually an instance of the geometry data type, and not the geography type as answer 4 suggests?

    Because there were only one wrong, I stopped reading at the "geometry" column, but I agree with you that I would "logically" would say that a line is geometry, not geographic...but, you can fly a line between two city, so I may have, maybe, not sure... but now I am certainly wondering, so I checked this and found that link to http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb964711.aspx

    It says "As the figure indicates, the seven instantiable types of the geometry and geography data types are Point, MultiPoint, LineString, MultiLineString, Polygon, MultiPolygon, and GeometryCollectio"...

  • Richard Warr

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6955

    Interestingly there are now 39% incorrect answers but only 31% of people picked the wrong answer. I'm assuming that means that 8% chose less than three answers.

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  • Thomas Abraham

    SSChampion

    Points: 10761

    I stopped processing when I saw that #3 was clearly incorrect, leaving the other 3 true by elimination and the specification of three correct answers. In a hurry this morning - we've got 164 high school students coming through for a "career expo" and tour of the facility. 164 teenagers in a shop with lasers and a thousand sharp tools. What could go wrong????

    [font="Verdana"]Please don't go. The drones need you. They look up to you.[/font]
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  • TomThomson

    SSC Guru

    Points: 104772

    Richard Warr (10/26/2011)


    Interestingly there are now 39% incorrect answers but only 31% of people picked the wrong answer. I'm assuming that means that 8% chose less than three answers.

    The missing wrong answers are now down to 7% (31% picked the wrong answer, 38% of answers were incorrect).

    There are all sorts of possibilities. 😀

    Currently the percentages of answers add up to 286%. If everyone had picked 3 answers, they would add up to 300%. So there's a 14% discrepancy. It could be that 14% of people picked only 2 answers (and half of those people had the wrong answer as one of their two), while everyone else picked 3 answers. Or perhaps 7% of people picked only 1 answer, none of those people picked the wrong answer, and everyone else picked 3 answers. Or anything in between that adds up right.

    At first site that looks as if the proportion of people selecting fewer than 3 answers must be between 7% and 14%, but that's not correct: we also have to consider what might have happened if some people picked 4 answers, don't we? :w00t:

    Suppose 12% of people picked 4 answers and 26% picked 2 answers (to get the 14% totals discrepancy); then no one who picked 3 answers picked the wrong answer, while 19/26 (19% of all people) of the people with only two answers picked the wrong answer.

    So all we can say is that the number of people who didn't pick three answers (ie the number who picked 1,2, or 4 answers) is somewhere between 7% and 38%, while the number who picked fewer than 3 answers is somewhere between 7% and 26%.

    As you can see, trying to count the proportion of people with other than 3 answers from the information provided is not very sensible, even if one uses the totals discrepancy as well as the wrong to incorrect discrepancy to limit the possibilities. 😉

    Tom

  • WILLIAM MITCHELL

    SSChampion

    Points: 13651

    #1 says "UDT" but the reference says "implemented as a .NET common language runtime (CLR) data type in SQL Server." what am I missing?

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