Relational By Default

  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 715334

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item Relational By Default

  • Gary Varga

    SSC Guru

    Points: 82166

    On this website's forums we seem to have a collection of reasonable individuals, on the whole, who are prepared to agree that it is best to apply the most appropriate technology regardless of how it would effect their position.

    Unfortunately there is too much biased opinion for all sides. And this is something that as IT professionals we must counter every day.

    Gaz

    -- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!

  • g.brennan

    Old Hand

    Points: 381

    Over time I've realised that while I have enjoyed development using a dozen or so database and non-database languages (and still enjoy it) development by its nature rarely looks at the wider corporate picture.

    These days I find it hard to justify any application specific inventions of shared data, it seems logical to me now that we should constrain the attempts to just add more structural without governance.

    In fact outside of a couple of minor use cases experience tells methat the whole schema-less concept has the characteristics of an anti-pattern.

  • call.copse

    SSCoach

    Points: 16835

    A very interesting read thanks. I think I'm getting a better picture of what that is about - it's sometimes tricky to get a real idea between the rantings of zealots. As stated most here try and take things on their merits!

  • Abrar Ahmad_

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4208

    [font="Verdana"]Surely, if it is hit and trial + concerning human biases then we are no where but tricky play of money and modes of managers.

    Merit based analysis and decision is too away; as we see people aren't even able to adopt changes in Relational Model in practical. :blush:[/font]

  • Ken Barker

    SSC Journeyman

    Points: 99

    I see this more as an inability of the various engines behind "established" SQL DB's to scale well beyond a point. Teradata is one however that has attempted to address the issue, however requires underlying knowledge to achieve this that could at a stretch be termed "NoDB" as well as lack of affordability / general access.

  • Gary Varga

    SSC Guru

    Points: 82166

    Ken Barker (11/18/2015)


    ..."NoDB"...

    :sick:

    Gaz

    -- Stop your grinnin' and drop your linen...they're everywhere!!!

  • Andrew..Peterson

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 6657

    Gary Varga (11/18/2015)


    On this website's forums we seem to have a collection of reasonable individuals, on the whole, who are prepared to agree that it is best to apply the most appropriate technology regardless of how it would effect their position.

    Unfortunately there is too much biased opinion for all sides. And this is something that as IT professionals we must counter every day.

    Agree with Gary 100%. Both NoSQL and relational databases are tools. Years ago, I found an article on how Klout used Hadoop to capture activity and then , after organizing it, pushed it into an SSAS cube. Point is that it went from unstructured to structured so it could be used.

    The more you are prepared, the less you need it.

  • g.britton

    SSChampion

    Points: 13685

    Microsoft has embraced a hybrid approach with Polybase

    Gerald Britton, MCSE-DP, MVPToronto PASS Chapter[/url]

  • xsevensinzx

    One Orange Chip

    Points: 25531

    I'm still new in developing my data professional career, but here is my two cents.

    I personally view what I do and what others do (better) as experts in all things data (or at least the pursuit of). It's a different mindset, a different set of skills and objectives that normally are not a primary concern of a developer.

    Because of that, putting more weight on the developer to control the schema through code along with everything else is just minimizing the need for data professionals and consolidating those responsibilities to one position. A position that already is overworked, under resourced and possibly not even specialized in the consolidated areas.

    That's a problem simply because the profession, something we are trained or training ourselves to do, is considered easy enough to just consolidate and stick all on the developer to develop, scale and maintain.

    I think that's a decision that ultimately will lead to more issues in the long run, especially when the only benefit is making it easier for the developer to be more flexible with the data as opposed to letting two professionals correctly identify what is best in both areas as most of us do today.

  • akljfhnlaflkj

    SSC Guru

    Points: 76202

    call.copse (11/18/2015)


    A very interesting read thanks.

    Ditto

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