Precision required

  • Comments posted to this topic are about the item Precision required

    David Bridge
    David Bridge Technology Limited
    www.davidbridgetechnology.com

  • an easy one for the day !!!

    thanks for the question

    ~ demonfox
    ___________________________________________________________________
    Wondering what I would do next , when I am done with this one :ermm:

  • demonfox (3/13/2013)


    an easy one for the day !!!

    thanks for the question

    +1

    Thanks David!

    ~ Lokesh Vij


    Guidelines for quicker answers on T-SQL question[/url]
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    Link to my Blog Post --> www.SQLPathy.com[/url]

    Follow me @Twitter

  • easy +1 🙂

    _______________________________________________________________
    To get quick answer follow this link:
    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/

  • I thought smalldatetime will round off to next day only if there is 2 seconds difference and answered both will return day as 24.

    --
    Dineshbabu
    Desire to learn new things..

  • Lokesh Vij (3/13/2013)


    demonfox (3/13/2013)


    an easy one for the day !!!

    thanks for the question

    +1

    Thanks David!

    +2

    Jason...AKA CirqueDeSQLeil
    _______________________________________________
    I have given a name to my pain...MCM SQL Server, MVP
    SQL RNNR
    Posting Performance Based Questions - Gail Shaw[/url]
    Learn Extended Events

  • Thanks David Bridge for good and interesting question. 🙂

    Thanks
    Vinay Kumar
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    Keep Learning - Keep Growing !!!

  • Most disappointing. I was sure when I got to the thread I'd see several pages of identical replies saying that it gives an error about assigning variables in the declare statement. What is the world coming to?!

  • This was removed by the editor as SPAM

  • Interestingly, if I run the code, I get:

    Msg 242, Level 16, State 3, Line 1

    The conversion of a varchar data type to a datetime data type resulted in an out-of-range value.

    But if I change the first line to DECLARE @Datetime datetime = '2013-02-24T23:59:30' then it works as expected.

    What do I have that is different (I'm in the UK if that helps)?

    _____________________________________________________________________
    MCSA SQL Server 2012

  • Richard Warr (3/14/2013)


    What do I have that is different (I'm in the UK if that helps)?

    Locale settings.

    Contrary to popular belief, yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss and yyyy-mm-dd are NOT a guaranteed safe date format. This can, in some locales, still be interpreted as yyyy-dd-mm.

    The only guaranteed safe formats for datetime are:

    * yyyymmdd for date only; no seperators.

    * yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss or yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss.ttt (where ttt is thousands of a second) for date and time; the dashes, uppercase T, colons (and dot in the second version) are all required seperators.

    For the date data type, rules have changed slightly. I know both yyyy-mm-dd and yyyymmdd are guaranteed for date. I don't know if there are more changes.


    Hugo Kornelis, SQL Server/Data Platform MVP (2006-2016)
    Visit my SQL Server blog: https://sqlserverfast.com/blog/
    SQL Server Execution Plan Reference: https://sqlserverfast.com/epr/

  • Thanks for the question. I need review with date types.

  • Hugo Kornelis (3/14/2013)


    Richard Warr (3/14/2013)


    What do I have that is different (I'm in the UK if that helps)?

    Locale settings.

    Contrary to popular belief, yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss and yyyy-mm-dd are NOT a guaranteed safe date format. This can, in some locales, still be interpreted as yyyy-dd-mm.

    The only guaranteed safe formats for datetime are:

    * yyyymmdd for date only; no seperators.

    * yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss or yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss.ttt (where ttt is thousands of a second) for date and time; the dashes, uppercase T, colons (and dot in the second version) are all required seperators.

    For the date data type, rules have changed slightly. I know both yyyy-mm-dd and yyyymmdd are guaranteed for date. I don't know if there are more changes.

    Thank you Hugo. Pleased to say that I always use the "T" format (which I believe to be ISO) and encourage colleagues to do the same!

    _____________________________________________________________________
    MCSA SQL Server 2012

  • Richard Warr (3/14/2013)


    Hugo Kornelis (3/14/2013)


    Richard Warr (3/14/2013)


    What do I have that is different (I'm in the UK if that helps)?

    Locale settings.

    Contrary to popular belief, yyyy-mm-dd hh:mm:ss and yyyy-mm-dd are NOT a guaranteed safe date format. This can, in some locales, still be interpreted as yyyy-dd-mm.

    The only guaranteed safe formats for datetime are:

    * yyyymmdd for date only; no seperators.

    * yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss or yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss.ttt (where ttt is thousands of a second) for date and time; the dashes, uppercase T, colons (and dot in the second version) are all required seperators.

    For the date data type, rules have changed slightly. I know both yyyy-mm-dd and yyyymmdd are guaranteed for date. I don't know if there are more changes.

    Thank you Hugo. Pleased to say that I always use the "T" format (which I believe to be ISO) and encourage colleagues to do the same!

    I have never used this 'T' format :w00t:

    _______________________________________________________________
    To get quick answer follow this link:
    http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/

  • I have never used this 'T' format :w00t:

    I need a review on SQL Server format.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Hai Ton
    My Db4Breakfast blog.

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