Numeric and Decimal

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  • frederico_fonseca

    SSChampion

    Points: 14233

    Steve -  someone calendar messed up - your post is dated "December 3, 2019 at 12:00 am"

  • ktflash

    Ten Centuries

    Points: 1093

    This post always appears on top of the "latest topic" section for me, is this for anyone else here aswell?

    If not, has anyone an idea how to get it rid from there, i have not subscribed to it or anything.

    Unbenannt

     

    NVM i am stupid, this will probably disappear after Dec the 3rd

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks ago by  ktflash.

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  • Steve Jones - SSC Editor

    SSC Guru

    Points: 716659

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item Numeric and Decimal

  • Stewart "Arturius" Campbell

    SSC Guru

    Points: 71494

    Nice question, thanks Steve

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  • jcelko212 32090

    SSCrazy Eights

    Points: 8881

    This is another example of Microsoft versus ANSI/ISO. When we set up the DECIMAL and NUMERIC data types, we were thinking of COBOL style picture data and BCD data. The NUMERIC(S,P) data type was supposed to be exactly that many decimal places, like COBOL. The DECIMAL(S,P) had to suppose at least that many decimal places, but could be more precise, like BCD.

    Please post DDL and follow ANSI/ISO standards when asking for help. 

  • frederico_fonseca

    SSChampion

    Points: 14233

    jcelko212 32090 wrote:

    This is another example of Microsoft versus ANSI/ISO. When we set up the DECIMAL and NUMERIC data types, we were thinking of COBOL style picture data and BCD data. The NUMERIC(S,P) data type was supposed to be exactly that many decimal places, like COBOL. The DECIMAL(S,P) had to suppose at least that many decimal places, but could be more precise, like BCD.

    another block of bullshit - we don't think of COBOL - neither does COBOL PIC behave the same way as DB datatypes

    COBOL PIC 9(9)V9(3) = SQL decimal(12,3) - how are they the same?

  • jcelko212 32090

    SSCrazy Eights

    Points: 8881

    >> another block of bullshit - we don't think of COBOL - neither does COBOL PIC behave the same way as DB datatypes

    COBOL PIC 9(9)V9(3) = SQL decimal(12,3) - how are they the same? <<

    When we were picking the datatypes for the SQL standards, we wanted to make it easy for existing datatypes in other languages to map into SQL. The standards describe behavior and not implementation. This is why we have numeric and decimal, as well as real and float in SQL.

    Jim Melton's book "SQL:1999" has a chapter on the various language in embeddings. Alphabetically, the languages we supported at that time were Ada, C, COBOL, Fortran, mumps, Pascal and PL/1. Others have been added over the years. Today, we also tend to write more pure SQL code and not using beddings as much.

     

     

    Please post DDL and follow ANSI/ISO standards when asking for help. 

  • Ray Herring

    SSCertifiable

    Points: 5356

    frederico_fonseca wrote:

    jcelko212 32090 wrote:

    another block of bullshit - we don't think of COBOL - neither does COBOL PIC behave the same way as DB datatypes

    COBOL PIC 9(9)V9(3) = SQL decimal(12,3) - how are they the same?

    Your reply is quite unprofessional and not particularly useful.  There are still many LOC of Cobol running in the world.  Ever changing standards, updated technology, and improved techniques often result in language artifacts that seem dumb to us today.

    Personally, I think you owe Joe and apology for the tone and language you used.   And you owe the rest of us a more useful comment on the technical issues under discussion.

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