NoSQL and Getting Involved with It / Or is it a fad?

  • S. Kusen

    SSChampion

    Points: 10836

    Hi all,

    I've been a SQL DBA for just about 10 years, and my company's development teams have been really eager to adopt the likes of Cassandra and Couchbase for some of the applications. The main use case for couchbase so far is for faster and more flexible replication than what SQL Server can offer up. Flexibility will be addressed by json support in SQL 2016, but the replication does seem to be something that these technologies can do fairly well.

    Now, I would guess I'm not alone, but I feel that I am shoehorned into the corner with SQL Server since I've been doing it so long, I have very little familiarity with the Linux OS, and I still feel that SQL is very predominant in the market.

    However, I can't help but feel that Oracle and SQL are being crapped on at my current company, yet the adoption of Couchbase and others just feels like a fad to me.

    So, I figured I would spawn a discussion here- is it a fad? If you have gotten exposure to it, how did you get involved (in my shop, mainly developers are deploying and owning it), and have you had success/see it succeeding long-term?

  • RTaylor2208

    SSChampion

    Points: 13188

    I wouldn't say its a fad, but its definitely still in the infancy period. We currently use DynamoDB in Amazon Web Services and MongoDB in on site solutions, although the rest of our database estate is predominantly SQL server with some Oracle servers supporting internal finance applications.

    Being a SQL Server DBA myself its been a struggle learning the new tech and linux all at the same time. I'm still not convinced either that its a great solution, however they do deal with unstructured data much better than a relational database.

    Alot of the NoSQL options are open source as well so you don't necessarily get the same level of support that you would get with the big RDBMS players like SQL Server, Oracle and MySQL.

    MCITP SQL 2005, MCSA SQL 2012

  • S. Kusen

    SSChampion

    Points: 10836

    RTaylor2208 (7/1/2015)


    I wouldn't say its a fad, but its definitely still in the infancy period. We currently use DynamoDB in Amazon Web Services and MongoDB in on site solutions, although the rest of our database estate is predominantly SQL server with some Oracle servers supporting internal finance applications.

    Being a SQL Server DBA myself its been a struggle learning the new tech and linux all at the same time. I'm still not convinced either that its a great solution, however they do deal with unstructured data much better than a relational database.

    Alot of the NoSQL options are open source as well so you don't necessarily get the same level of support that you would get with the big RDBMS players like SQL Server, Oracle and MySQL.

    Exactly how I feel regarding the struggle in learning the new tech.

  • SeattleDBA

    Ten Centuries

    Points: 1019

    I have been feeling a bit of the same insecurity regarding my purely SQL Server background. I feel the need to add more to my skills regarding the new technologies that are linked to databases.

    One of the things you might consider learning is Hadoop, which SQL Server is now designed to work with.

    https://www.brentozar.com/archive/2011/11/hadoop-basics-for-sql-server-dbas/

    http://sqlmag.com/business-intelligence/integrating-hadoop-sql-server

  • SeattleDBA

    Ten Centuries

    Points: 1019

    I have been feeling a bit of the same insecurity regarding my purely SQL Server background. I feel the need to add more to my skills regarding the new technologies that are linked to databases.

    One of the things you might consider learning is Hadoop, which SQL Server is now designed to work with.

    https://www.brentozar.com/archive/2011/11/hadoop-basics-for-sql-server-dbas/

    http://sqlmag.com/business-intelligence/integrating-hadoop-sql-server

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