Missing green arrow on the sql server icon in object explore

  • Jacob Wilkins - Friday, June 9, 2017 3:14 PM

    On the other side of that coin, I'll use SSMS from the server running the instance if necessary, but I generally discourage others from doing it.

    To pick just one reason, I've seen a remarkable number of people blow up a C drive from mistakenly running a query that returns far more rows than they expect.

    I'd rather that happen to a client machine 🙂

    People that are prone to blowing things up by returning too many rows shouldn't be in such a position as to be RDC'd into the box to begin with.  Nor should the DBA be doing dev work on such a connection.  It's meant as a failsafe.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".
    "Dear Lord... I'm a DBA so please give me patience because, if you give me strength, I'm going to need bail money too!"

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • Jeff Moden - Friday, June 9, 2017 5:46 PM

    Jacob Wilkins - Friday, June 9, 2017 3:14 PM

    On the other side of that coin, I'll use SSMS from the server running the instance if necessary, but I generally discourage others from doing it.

    To pick just one reason, I've seen a remarkable number of people blow up a C drive from mistakenly running a query that returns far more rows than they expect.

    I'd rather that happen to a client machine 🙂

    People that are prone to blowing things up by returning too many rows shouldn't be in such a position as to be RDC'd into the box to begin with.  Nor should the DBA be doing dev work on such a connection.  It's meant as a failsafe.

    I agree that in a perfect world the only people who had access would be people who make zero mistakes.
    Unfortunately, such people are hard to find, and it's not just error-prone people who make errors 🙂

    Also, in my particular scenario, I don't have final say in these things; I must work with what our customers give.

    That some people SHOULDN'T have access is scarce consolation when they in fact do and run the drive out of space.

    It's an imperfect world out there 🙂

    At any rate, I'm hijacking the thread, so I'll save any more comments for another day/thread.

  • Jacob Wilkins - Friday, June 9, 2017 7:36 PM

    Jeff Moden - Friday, June 9, 2017 5:46 PM

    Jacob Wilkins - Friday, June 9, 2017 3:14 PM

    On the other side of that coin, I'll use SSMS from the server running the instance if necessary, but I generally discourage others from doing it.

    To pick just one reason, I've seen a remarkable number of people blow up a C drive from mistakenly running a query that returns far more rows than they expect.

    I'd rather that happen to a client machine 🙂

    People that are prone to blowing things up by returning too many rows shouldn't be in such a position as to be RDC'd into the box to begin with.  Nor should the DBA be doing dev work on such a connection.  It's meant as a failsafe.

    I agree that in a perfect world the only people who had access would be people who make zero mistakes.
    Unfortunately, such people are hard to find, and it's not just error-prone people who make errors 🙂

    Also, in my particular scenario, I don't have final say in these things; I must work with what our customers give.

    That some people SHOULDN'T have access is scarce consolation when they in fact do and run the drive out of space.

    It's an imperfect world out there 🙂

    At any rate, I'm hijacking the thread, so I'll save any more comments for another day/thread.

    In fact, that's the whole purpose of being logged in through an RDC... people make mistakes and already being logged in can help recover from many of them.

    But, it sounds like your situation is quite a bit different and so not appropriate to have such a login waiting in the wings.

    --Jeff Moden


    RBAR is pronounced "ree-bar" and is a "Modenism" for Row-By-Agonizing-Row.
    First step towards the paradigm shift of writing Set Based code:
    ________Stop thinking about what you want to do to a ROW... think, instead, of what you want to do to a COLUMN.
    "Change is inevitable... change for the better is not".
    "Dear Lord... I'm a DBA so please give me patience because, if you give me strength, I'm going to need bail money too!"

    Helpful Links:
    How to post code problems
    How to Post Performance Problems
    Create a Tally Function (fnTally)

  • Old post, I know, but this might be helpful to some ending up here...

    Check any firewalls between SSMS and SQL Server. Verify connections with netstat -anob, on a server without the green arrow, you will only get port 1433 (or whatever SQL is configured to use). On a server with the green arrow, you'll see port 135 and some high dynamic tcp ports being used between both side because SSMS is using RPC for this.

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