Maybe Being Famous is a Bad Idea

  • I suspect that other fellow, who is in IT, will disagree. I think crazy distributes pretty evenly through society, even into IT.

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    The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood... Theodore Roosevelt
    The Scary DBA
    Author of: SQL Server 2017 Query Performance Tuning, 5th Edition and SQL Server Execution Plans, 3rd Edition
    Product Evangelist for Red Gate Software

  • Grant Fritchey wrote:

    I suspect that other fellow, who is in IT, will disagree. I think crazy distributes pretty evenly through society, even into IT.

    Agreed.  Some of the "interesting" private messages I've received even here after posting simple fixes or suggestions would support that observation.  Just goes to show how little it takes to get that bit of creepy or crazy to pop up (pretty sure no one here could pick me out of a lineup).

    Pretty sure that most of the heavy hitters on here (current and former) have seen their fair share of the same.  Thus in some cases why we don't see as much of them as before, or why they've left.

     

     

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    Your lack of planning does not constitute an emergency on my part...unless you're my manager...or a director and above...or a really loud-spoken end-user..All right - what was my emergency again?

  • Eric M Russell wrote:

    The parts of our brain that we use on the job tend to become the most dominant, and that carries over into our daily lives and off hours.

    I think that is an excellent point. When you spend hundreds of hours trying to think like the machine, you start to think like the machine. Right/wrong yes/no on/off black/white. Unfortunately, this type of thinking is a poor fit for real life, which is an analog of grey shades. Thinking like the machine can lead us into many mistakes where binary reasoning does not apply. I struggle against this constantly.

  • GeorgeCopeland wrote:

    Eric M Russell wrote:

    The parts of our brain that we use on the job tend to become the most dominant, and that carries over into our daily lives and off hours.

    I think that is an excellent point. When you spend hundreds of hours trying to think like the machine, you start to think like the machine. Right/wrong yes/no on/off black/white. Unfortunately, this type of thinking is a poor fit for real life, which is an analog of grey shades. Thinking like the machine can lead us into many mistakes where binary reasoning does not apply. I struggle against this constantly.

    Binary decision making doesn't mean that the output is either black or white. It just means there is a logical thought process that, while not perfect, it improves over time with training and access to better information. Actually, I consider myself more flexible and reasonable than most neuro-typical people, because my core opinions are not set in stone based on group identity.

    Yes, logical thinking is a poor fit for interpersonal relationships - but can be useful for many other aspects of life.

    "Do not seek to follow in the footsteps of the wise. Instead, seek what they sought." - Matsuo Basho

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