Largest Unit

  • Herb Overstreet-363572

    SSC Eights!

    Points: 886

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item Largest Unit

  • Yogeesh

    SSC-Addicted

    Points: 489

    The referenced article also looked greek and latin to me :unsure:

  • Randolph West

    SSCommitted

    Points: 1559

    :Whistling:

    Ok, so maybe I'm just being a nuisance here, but I know 1024^8 and 2^80 were the same, and very similar to the others, and didn't realise that there were checkboxes instead of radio buttons, so now what? I'm old-school - bytes work in multiples of 2.

    *grumble*

  • Craig@Work

    SSCrazy

    Points: 2266

    This has what to do with SQL ... ?

    ... and the question isn't exactly clear.

    I think this is one that could have done with wider 'review' (as with yesterday's question) prior to being posted 🙂

  • majorbloodnock

    SSCrazy Eights

    Points: 9389

    He, he. I liked this question.

    However, I'm intrigued about that last comment - about a yobibyte theoretically being big enough to contain all the information in the universe. More particularly, given the universe is far larger than we as a race have even managed to visit, let alone research, we can't know everything in the universe, so can't know how much information is left to be discovered. If that's the case, how can we know a yobibyte will be enough to contain it all? I don't say it's impossible, but I'd love to know more about a theory that can calculate what's seemingly incalculable.

    A bit deep for a Friday morning, but what the heck.

    Semper in excretia, sumus solum profundum variat

  • Shaun McGuile

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4111

    Total Bull!

    1024^8 != 10^24

    1000^8 != 2^80

    Store everything in the universe? Doubting Dog says - 'I doubt it!':P

    Hey I've invented the 'ShaunyByte' its 2^(80 + an number incrementing as required) and actually can store data about everything in the multiverse (multiple universes). 😀

    The unit's symbol wil be 'BS'

    so you'll be able to same my system's got a 10 BS memory etc.

    I gonna take out a patent on this, so everyone will have to pay me royalties.:cool:

    So there! 😉

    Hiding under a desk from SSIS Implemenation Work :crazy:

  • cjones-525131

    SSC Veteran

    Points: 272

    This is wrong.

    1024^8 = 1208925819614629174706176

    2^80 = 1208925819614629174706176

    1208925819614629174706176 = 1 yobibyte

    10^24 = 1000000000000000000000000

    1000^8 = 1000000000000000000000000

    1000000000000000000000000 = 1 Yottabyte

    See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yottabyte

    The IEC standards all now refer to Kilobytes, megabytes, gigabytes etc. being 1000^x. 1024^x is now refered to as a kibibyte, mebibyte, gibibyte etc.

  • Hugo Kornelis

    SSC Guru

    Points: 64685

    Okay, I've got two comments this time.

    One - the answer key appears to be wrong again. The article referenced is kind enough to explain that both 1000^8 and 10^24 are equal to 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes, and that both 1024^8 and 2^80 are equal to 1,208,925,819,614,629,174,706,176 bytes. I won't try to check that (I'm good at doing calculations in my head, but not that good). I can't imagina that anyone here will not agree that 1,208,925,819,614,629,174,706,176 bytes is more than 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes - so clearly, only two out of the four answers have to be checked, not all four. I'm quite sure that Steve will correct this as soon as night is over in his part of the world.

    The more fundamental comment is about the question itself. It lacks context. "Largest unit of information defined" - by whom? for what purpose? when? (for I'm sure that one day, we'll need names for 1,000 YB and 1,024 YiB). But the whom and for what purpose questions are what I really miss in this question. A quick google search for "largest unit of information" learned me that the largest unit of information is actually:

    * A module or chapter (http://blogs.ittoolbox.com/eai/implementation/archives/documentation-design-document-blocking-16698) - in the content of documentation design

    * A bit (http://web.njit.edu/~walsh/powers/bits.vs.bytes.html) - in the content of units of information a computer can handle

    * A "word" (http://oak.cats.ohiou.edu/~piccard/mis300/pcintro.htm) - in the context of what can be transferred between memory and CPU in a single step

    Going back to SQL Server, I didn't even need to use Gooogle to come up with

    * 2 GB - in the context of what can be stored in a single column

    * 8,000 bytes - in the context of what can be stored in a single page

    * 32 KB - in the context of disk I/O (extent size)

    * Collection - in the context of the XML data type

    In short todays QotD was

    * Poorly worded (as it fails to give enough context to the question),

    * Not related to SQL Server at all

    * Not related to database design and theory at all

    As a fix, I'd suggest Steve to change the question to "How much data can a YB store (check all that apply, for any definition of YB that is in use, recommended or not)". With this wording, the question is clear (though still not quite relevant for SQL Server or for databases in general for the foreseeable future), and the current answer key becomes correct.

    On a final note, as someone else already mentioned up-thread, the remark in the referenced article that "Yottabyte can, in theory, store everything in the entire universe", is of course plain nonsense. I learned at school that 1 gram of hydrogen contains approximately 6 * 10^23 atoms (Avogadro Constant - though Wikipedia just tells me that this has since been redefined as 6 grams (grammes?) of pure carbon). Anywway, if I want to store just 2 bytes of state information for each of those atoms, I'd already need 2 YB. And I think that the entire universe holds just a tad more than a single gram of hydrogen or 6 grams of carbon...


    Hugo Kornelis, SQL Server/Data Platform MVP (2006-2016)
    Visit my SQL Server blog: https://sqlserverfast.com/blog/
    SQL Server Execution Plan Reference: https://sqlserverfast.com/epr/

  • Shaun McGuile

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4111

    Hugo:

    That is exactly why I've invented the ShaunyByte!:D

    A single BS is all you need, no matter how much data you have.

    the expanding BS is given an order to denote how much it has been inflated by.

    e.g. BS10 is (2^90)

    --Shaun

    Hiding under a desk from SSIS Implemenation Work :crazy:

  • majorbloodnock

    SSCrazy Eights

    Points: 9389

    Shaun McGuile (4/4/2008)


    Hugo:

    That is exactly why I've invented the ShaunyByte!:D

    A single BS is all you need, no matter how much data you have.

    the expanding BS is given an order to denote how much it has been inflated by.

    e.g. BS10 is (2^90)

    --Shaun

    ...and that's a helluva lot of BS 😀

    Semper in excretia, sumus solum profundum variat

  • Dave F-425609

    Right there with Babe

    Points: 740

    I agree with all the other protestors.

    1000^8=1024^8

    Sorry, that dog won't hunt.

    Secondly, where is the unit of measure? What is this a measure of, baby's breath and ether?

    Thirdly, the "describing the whole universe". How many atoms are there in the universe? And the can be of how many different varieties? Made up of how many types of Muons?

    I seem to recall an article on this site stating that someone was being sued for selling a terabyte drive that was only 1000GB. This question would seem to be of the manufacturer's ilk.

  • TraderSam

    SSCrazy

    Points: 2931

    Geeeshhh...stop whining already...

    This was a fun question that made you think and do some research.

    Don't make more out of it than that. If missing the question ruined your day, you shouldn't play this game.

    Here is a another reference...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yottabyte

    Here is a reference to understand why the numbers are considered equivalent...has to do with context.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte

    Oh, and I missed it too...but I learned something.

    Relax...enjoy life! Its Friday!

    If it was easy, everybody would be doing it!;)

  • Anthony K. Valley

    SSC-Addicted

    Points: 471

    Hmmm.... I assumed the question was specifically about pages, extents, and allocations in SQL Server. I had no idea that it was about general computer storage. Missed it, not a big deal.

  • Jack Corbett

    SSC Guru

    Points: 184381

    Anthony K. Valley (4/4/2008)


    Hmmm.... I assumed the question was specifically about pages, extents, and allocations in SQL Server. I had no idea that it was about general computer storage. Missed it, not a big deal.

    I thought the same. I also, as someone else posted, did not notice that it was one with multiple answers. If I had I still would have gotten it wrong as I actually used calculator to find out what each expression was and found that there were 2 final answers, so I would have chosen 2. I definitely think that the QOD should have some context though.

    Jack Corbett
    Consultant - Straight Path Solutions
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  • BarbW

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4759

    This question baffled me for the same reasons already mentioned.

    10^24 <> 1 024^8

    This is the second time this week the "poorly worded" QOD caused numerous comical replies. Maybe I will start waiting until tomorrow to answer today's question! QOT - In the end, I certainly enjoy the comments while learning more about the topics. Thanks all 😀

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