Kill SPID (SQL Spackle)

  • Kenneth.Fisher

    SSCoach

    Points: 19637

    Comments posted to this topic are about the item Kill SPID (SQL Spackle)

    Kenneth FisherI was once offered a wizards hat but it got in the way of my dunce cap.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------For better, quicker answers on T-SQL questions, click on the following... http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/[/url]For better answers on performance questions, click on the following... http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/SQLServerCentral/66909/[/url]Link to my Blog Post --> www.SQLStudies.com[/url]

  • Krtyknm

    SSC Eights!

    Points: 884

    Do you think killing the Spid will resolve issue? What about the transaction running behind that?

  • Kenneth.Fisher

    SSCoach

    Points: 19637

    The KILL command does end the transaction being run under the specified SPID. It then has to roll back of course so there may be a delay depending on how big the transaction was.

    Kenneth FisherI was once offered a wizards hat but it got in the way of my dunce cap.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------For better, quicker answers on T-SQL questions, click on the following... http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/[/url]For better answers on performance questions, click on the following... http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/SQLServerCentral/66909/[/url]Link to my Blog Post --> www.SQLStudies.com[/url]

  • Krtyknm

    SSC Eights!

    Points: 884

    I think KILL command will automatically ROLLBACK the transaction my point is if we use KILL command there will be a data loss.

  • Kenneth.Fisher

    SSCoach

    Points: 19637

    Yes if you use KILL to end a transaction it will be rolled back and any changes made by that transaction will no longer exist. Unfortunately sometimes there is no option. For example if a developer runs an update query but forgets to commit the transaction and then leaves for the night. Then later that evening your batch process won't complete because it's blocked. Your only real option is to kill the developers session and roll back their transaction.

    Another example of using KILL is when you have a runaway query that is taking FAR longer than you intended or can allow.

    KILL is an emergency fix it's not something that should be used on any regular basis.

    Kenneth FisherI was once offered a wizards hat but it got in the way of my dunce cap.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------For better, quicker answers on T-SQL questions, click on the following... http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/[/url]For better answers on performance questions, click on the following... http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/SQLServerCentral/66909/[/url]Link to my Blog Post --> www.SQLStudies.com[/url]

  • Kevin3NF

    SSCarpal Tunnel

    Points: 4674

    Just a thought...but an additional item regarding finding the lead blocker would be a great plus in this article 🙂

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  • Luis Cazares

    SSC Guru

    Points: 183586

    Kenneth.Fisher (7/1/2014)


    Yes if you use KILL to end a transaction it will be rolled back and any changes made by that transaction will no longer exist. Unfortunately sometimes there is no option. For example if a developer runs an update query but forgets to commit the transaction and then leaves for the night. Then later that evening your batch process won't complete because it's blocked. Your only real option is to kill the developers session and roll back their transaction.

    Another example of using KILL is when you have a runaway query that is taking FAR longer than you intended or can allow.

    KILL is an emergency fix it's not something that should be used on any regular basis.

    I thought you were speaking of killing the developer. That seemed extreme but slightly reasonable. :hehe:

    Luis C.
    General Disclaimer:
    Are you seriously taking the advice and code from someone from the internet without testing it? Do you at least understand it? Or can it easily kill your server?

    How to post data/code on a forum to get the best help: Option 1 / Option 2
  • Kenneth.Fisher

    SSCoach

    Points: 19637

    I've had days where killing the developer was discussed. Primarily when an Access query was left open over the weekend and blocked the batch cycle that ran at 2am Sat morning. Generally I've found killing the session and a discussion with the developer (after time to cool off) works better and causes the police less concern.

    Kenneth FisherI was once offered a wizards hat but it got in the way of my dunce cap.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------For better, quicker answers on T-SQL questions, click on the following... http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/[/url]For better answers on performance questions, click on the following... http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/SQLServerCentral/66909/[/url]Link to my Blog Post --> www.SQLStudies.com[/url]

  • gotqn

    SSC Veteran

    Points: 260

    We are using the sp_whoisactive stored procedure. You can check it:

    http://sqlmag.com/sql-server/spwhoisactive

    or downloaded it from here:

    http://sqlblog.com/blogs/adam_machanic/archive/2012/03/22/released-who-is-active-v11-11.aspx

  • Kenneth.Fisher

    SSCoach

    Points: 19637

    Excellent point. I should have included sp_whoisactive in the article. It is an awesome tool.

    Kenneth FisherI was once offered a wizards hat but it got in the way of my dunce cap.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------For better, quicker answers on T-SQL questions, click on the following... http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/Best+Practices/61537/[/url]For better answers on performance questions, click on the following... http://www.sqlservercentral.com/articles/SQLServerCentral/66909/[/url]Link to my Blog Post --> www.SQLStudies.com[/url]

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